NCSS Online Teachers' Library

The “Starving Time” Wikinquiry: Using a Wiki to Foster Historical Inquiry


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By Jeremy D. Stoddard, Mark J. Hofer, and Molly G. Buchanan
Highlighting a wikinquiry on the Jamestown colony’s ‘starving time,’ the authors demonstrate a wiki’s power to promote student collaboration, enhance communication, and improve construction of knowledge.

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Puritan Day: A Social Science Simulation


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By Joan Brodsky Schur
Eighth-grade students gain a greater understanding of social control and tyranny when they participate in a Puritan Day simulation.

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Harvest Ceremony—Beyond the Thanksgiving Myth


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--Johanna Gorelick and Genevieve Simermeyer/The Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian
While the modern story of Thanksgiving describes the original feast as a friendly gathering of neighbors, in reality it had much more to do with political alliances, diplomacy, and an attempt at peaceful coexistence.

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Lesson Plan: New England and the African Slave Trade


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—Choices for the 21st Century Education Program, Brown University
Although many people in the United States think of slavery as a Southern institution, New England has a more complex history of slavery and slave trading than many realize.

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Ribbons and Beads: Native American Art Reveals History and Culture


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Ava L. McCall
The textile arts are a valuable means by which students learn about the history of specific Native American nations.

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Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips


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--Nadine M. Roush
Some online activities are the next best thing to actually visiting Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia.

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Voyages of Discovery: Experiencing the Emotion of History


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--Daniel A. Kelin, II
In their roles as Henry Hudson's sailors (ca. 1610 C.E.), third grade students "faced the cold, loneliness, frustration, and disorientation of Hudson's last voyage."

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Voyages of Discovery: Experiencing the Emotion of History


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--Daniel A. Kelin, II
In their roles as Henry Hudson's sailors (ca. 1610 C.E.), third grade students "faced the cold, loneliness, frustration, and disorientation of Hudson's last voyage."

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“I” is for Indian? Dealing with Stereotypes in the Classroom


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--Mark Finchum
A primer for recognizing stereotyping where it might occur in alphabet books; textbooks; children's literature; activities around the Thanksgiving and Columbus holidays; and portrayals of modern life in the USA.

http://publications.socialstudies.org/yl/1804/180404.pdf

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Teaching About American Indians


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--Pamela McFaden Lobb
Consider four categories when selecting materials about American Indians: Native Authors (use whenever possible); art and illustration (avoid stereotypes); language (ex. avoid "squaw"); and perspective (avoid glorifying one historical point of view).

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