NCSS Online Teachers' Library

[em]Marbury v. Madison[/em]: Bicentennial of a Landmark Decision (Looking at the Law)


--James H. Landman
This article revisits the historic two-hundred-year-old verdict that affirmed the Supreme Court’s right to review, and overturn, congressional or executive acts it deems unconstitutional.

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A Picture’s Worth: Analyzing Historical Photographs in the Elementary Grades (Elementary Education)


--Keith C. Barton
Elementary teachers can use historical photographs in the classroom to engage young students in authentic historical inquiry. Students’ critical skills develop beyond mere observation as they consider what life was like when the photographs were taken.

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Eugenics Past and Present: Remembering [em]Buck v. Bell[/em]


--Michael J. Berson and Bárbara C. Cruz
The seventy-fifth anniversary of the Buck v. Bell case is an appropriate time for students to explore the ethical questions underlying eugenics principles, policies, and practices—from Nazi Germany’s sterilization laws to the Human Genome Project.

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Supreme Court Trends (Looking at the Law)


--Charles F. Williams
The year 2000 was a significant one for the Supreme Court. Many decisions affected education and children—from tobacco advertising to religion in the schools.

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Linking Literature and Primary Documents


--Pamela A. Nelson
Children's literature, primary source material, and active learning help students engage with history and prepare for citizenship.

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Breathing Life into History: Using Role-Playing to Engage Students


--Barbara C. Cruz and Shalini A. Murthy
With a bit of planning, teachers can utilize children's natural affinity for drama while teaching about historical events and people.

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“I” is for Indian? Dealing with Stereotypes in the Classroom


--Mark Finchum
A primer for recognizing stereotyping where it might occur in alphabet books; textbooks; children's literature; activities around the Thanksgiving and Columbus holidays; and portrayals of modern life in the USA.

http://publications.socialstudies.org/yl/1804/180404.pdf

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Teaching About American Indians


--Pamela McFaden Lobb
Consider four categories when selecting materials about American Indians: Native Authors (use whenever possible); art and illustration (avoid stereotypes); language (ex. avoid "squaw"); and perspective (avoid glorifying one historical point of view).

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Viewing American History Through Native Eyes


--Carol Carney Warren
Websites and books provide ideas for sharing a different perspective on U.S. history.

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A River Through Time:The Gila River and the Akimel O’odham


--Carol Carney Warren
Through the use of primary source materials, students can investigate the effects that dam construction on the Gila River has had on the lifestyle of the Pima Indians in central Arizona.

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