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Teaching Resources

Native Knowledge 360 (NMAI)

The National Museum of the American Indian has launch Native Knowledge 360°, a national education initiative to inspire and promote improved teaching and learning about American Indians. With this launch, NMAI is unveiling the new NK360° education webpages, featuring information about the initiative, educational resources for classrooms, and professional development opportunities and other important information for educators.
Visit http://nmai.si.edu/nk360/educators.cshtml.

Teaching Resources about Gun Violence

How are you addressing current events in your classroom? Please let us know at tssp@ncss.org, and send us links to the top few teaching resources that you rely on. We’ll consider them for including here, among the teaching resource and background articles that social studies educators have offered for sharing with colleagues. (No endorsement implied. See footnote.)

Epidemics and Society’s Response (NCSS; The Vaccine Makers Project; CDC)

The year 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the Spanish flu epidemic, which killed about one-third of the human population on Earth. We also have, this year, an especially virulent strain of the flue to contend with. How society prepares for, and responds to, infectious diseases is the topic of these teaching resources.

Raphael Mazzone and Lee Ann Potter, “Documents Related to the Flu Pandemic of 1918,” Social Education 70, no. 7 (November/December 2006): 393–396. *** As World War I neared its end, a worldwide epidemic claimed more victims than the war itself. The two featured documents recall the loss of life and havoc in the United States. Open access: https://www.socialstudies.org/publications/socialeducation/november-dece...

Diane Luke and Ann Winkler, “The Saffron Scourge: Society, Politics and Disease,” Social Education 71, no. 1 (January/February 2007): 40–43. *** By taking a closer look at various yellow fever outbreaks, the authors demonstrate for students the social, governmental, and economic impact of epidemics upon cities. For NCSS members: https://www.socialstudies.org/publications/socialeducation/january-febru...

The Vaccine Makers Project ("Hilleman" film clip, resources, curriculum). Ironically, the very success of vaccines in the 20th century created a public policy dilemma: people have

Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspectives (OSU online magazine)

Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspectives is a free, on-line magazine that includes articles, podcasts, short “milestones,” and Top Ten lists produced by some of America’s leading historians -- and all connecting the past with the present. Origins covers the globe.
The magazine is designed for use in high school and college classes in American history, world history, current events, and contemporary politics. It is a joint production of the history departments at Ohio State University and Miami University. You and your students can find it at origins.osu.edu.

Engaging Congress, an Interactive Game (CRG/IU)

The Center on Representative Government at Indiana University has launched "Engaging Congress," an interactive game that uses primary-source documents to explore the workings of American government and the challenges it faces in contemporary society. The app-based game is available to middle school and high school government, history, language arts and social studies programs as a fun tool for teaching the basic tenets of representative government, using documents and materials from the Library of Congress and other sources.

MLK Jr. Day/Black History Month

A collection of lesson plans and useful links are here. A photo shows Taylor Branch, Andrew Aydin, and U.S. Representative John Lewis at the NCSS Annual Conference in St. Louis, Missouri, November 2013. Branch is author of "The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement." Aydin is the co-author of Lewis's illustrated autobiography, "March (Books I-III)." High school lessons include

Decoding the Civil War (Huntington Libraries/NHPRC consortium)

The U.S. Civil War still captures, as does Abraham Lincoln’s presidency, the imagination and passion of young and old. While perpetually fascinating, with all we know and have learned, there is still much to discover with new materials, new stories. Decoding the Civil War is an online resource for multiple grade levels that invites students to examine actual telegram messages and place them in social and historical context.

Mindful Consumerism (Facing the Future)

The holidays are a good time to think about consumption, specifically, the impact that our own consumption has on the environment and our fellow humans. "Consumerism is related to consumption but it describes a particular worldview related to our consumption patterns. Everyone must consume resources like food and water in order to survive. Such resources are critical to human survival. However, we also consume resources for personal enjoyment, such as for entertainment and leisure, or maybe to treat yourself, or a friend with a gift.

Daniel Ellsberg: Danger of Nuclear War (NPR/Democracy Now)

On the closing day of the 97th NCSS Annual Conference, Daniel Ellsberg was slated to address the plenary gathering, but he was ill that day, and co-speaker Peter J. Kuznick adeptly filled the hour (as will be reported in the next TSSP newsletter). Ellsberg was soon back on his feet, giving a 59-minute radio interview, a few weeks later. Teachers who wonder what Ellsberg might have said could do worse than check out the podcast and

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