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Unsettling Narratives: Teaching About the Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

February 19, 2019 - 7:00pm EST

This webinar will introduce middle school social studies educators to several frameworks drawn from history and the social sciences, such as settler colonialism, physical and cultural genocide, and human rights, for teaching about the mass violence perpetrated against Indigenous peoples in the United States in the nineteenth century. Through the use of primary source documents, participants will learn about the 1862 U.S.-Dakota War and its aftermath, as a case study for teaching and learning about specific examples, as well as the broader history, of such mass violence. In addition, participants will analyze the competing narratives around how narratives U.S.-Dakota War have been remembered, memorialized, and taught over the past 150 years. Participants will discuss how the use of such newspaper accounts can be used to foster reading comprehension, document analysis, and media literacy skills in the classroom. Educational resources and sample lesson and unit plans will be provided. 

Participants will be introduced to several theoretical and educational frameworks, drawn from the academic fields of history, the social sciences and American Indian Studies, for teaching about the mass violence perpetrated against the Indigenous peoples of the United States, including settler colonialism, physical and cultural genocide, legal and human rights, and Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies. Participants will examine the 1862 U.S.-Dakota War and its aftermath through a variety of primary source documents (newspapers), learning how such newspaper accounts can be used to foster reading comprehension, document analysis, and media literacy skills in middle school social studies classrooms. Participants analyze the individual and collective memories around, and memorialization of, the U.S.-Dakota War over the past 150 years, as a case study for analyzing how mass violence against Indigenous peoples is understood and represented in United States history and the collective imaginary of the nation.

 

Fee: $25 members/$50 non-members

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Presenters

George Dalbo
Joseph Eggers
Brieanna Watters
Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

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