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Research Examining Impact of Asian American Teacher Citizenship Understandings on Teaching to Receive NCSS Exemplary Dissertation Award

SILVER SPRING, Md. (Oct. 10, 2017) - National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) selected “Hidden in History: Examining Asian American Elementary Teachers’ Enactment of Asian American History,” by Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, University of Texas in Austin as the 2017 Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award winner. The award will be presented at the NCSS 97th Annual Conference during the College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) Business Meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 5:15 p.m. at the InterContinental Hotel, San Francisco. Press Registration is available here. The NCSS Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award recognizes outstanding research completed in pursuit of the doctoral degree. For more information visit: http://www.socialstudies.org/awards/research/dissertation.
 
The NCSS Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award recognizes outstanding research completed in pursuit of the doctoral degree. For more information visit: http://www.socialstudies.org/awards/research/dissertation.
 
Naseem Rodríguez’s dissertation is a qualitative case study that explores how three Asian American elementary teachers enact Asian American histories in their classrooms, and how their personal experiences and understandings of citizenship inform and impact their work.
 
“Dr. Naseem Rodriguez adds to a body of literature that considers how critical race theory can be useful in classroom settings and how the rarely explored histories of Asians/Asian Americans and others can work to highlight the overt connections between culture and citizenship,” said Dr. Cinthia Salinas, Ruben E. Hinojosa Regents Professor in Education at the University of Texas, Austin.
 
The study seeks to shed light on how the distinct experiences lived by these teachers as the children of Asian immigrants and refugees, vastly different than those of their white peers and students, informed and influenced their worldviews, philosophies of teaching, and instructional choices. More specifically, the study seeks to answer three research questions: 1) How do Asian American elementary educators enact Asian American histories in their classrooms? 2) How do Asian American elementary educators enact Asian American histories through the use of picture books? 3) How is this instruction informed by their understandings of citizenship?
 
“Dr. Naseem Rodriguez’s research provides critical insights into how we might revitalize our elementary curriculum to be more inclusive of the diverse actors and events in our history. Thank you for your work! We are so pleased to honor you with this award,” said Terry Cherry, President, NCSS.
 
“Naseem Rodriguez’s research addresses the critical area of inclusiveness, a strategic priority for NCSS and our social studies profession. Her dissertation provides important understandings of how race, ethnicity, history, culture, and literacy work together to shape classroom practice. NCSS is delighted to honor her work which directly addresses our conference theme of “Expanding Visions/Bridging Traditions,”” said Dr. Lawrence Paska, Executive Director, NCSS.
 
The researcher will present a session on her dissertation titled: “Hidden in History: Examining Asian American Elementary Teachers’ Enactment of Asian American History” at the NCSS 97th Annual Conference in San Francisco on Friday, Nov. 17,  8:45-9:45 a.m. at the Moscone Center (West). Conference Press Registration is available here.
 
Naseem Rodríguez earned her Ph.D. under the advisement of Dr. Cinthia Salinas, Ruben E. Hinojosa Regents Professor in Education at the University of Texas, Austin. She is currently Assistant Professor of Elementary Social Studies in the School of Education at Iowa State University and uses critical race frameworks to explore how racial and cultural experiences impact Asian American and Latino/a pre- and in-service teachers' pedagogy and curricular enactment. Her other research interests include the teaching of immigration, adding counternarratives to the curriculum, teaching against Islamophobia, and broadening conceptualizations of citizenship.
 
The NCSS Annual Conference is the largest and most comprehensive social studies professional development conference in the United States where social studies educators share, interact, develop ideas, and enhance their skills. This year’s theme, “Expanding Visions/Bridging Traditions,” will offer more than 900 content-rich sessions covering all subjects and grade levels, a lineup of renowned speakers and education experts, and numerous exhibiting organizations displaying the latest in educational resources. For more information visit: http://www.socialstudies.org/conference.
 
Founded in 1921, National Council for the Social Studies is the largest professional association in the country devoted solely to social studies education. The mission of National Council for the Social Studies is to provide leadership, service, and support for all social studies educators. The NCSS membership represents K-12 classroom teachers, college and university faculty members, curriculum designers and specialists, social studies supervisors, and leaders in the various disciplines that constitute the social studies.
 
NCSS regards social studies as the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence. Within the school program, social studies provides coordinated, systematic study drawing upon such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology, as well as appropriate content from the humanities, mathematics, and natural sciences. The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.
 
For more information contact:
Ana Post
301.850.7655
 

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