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Thursday, November 29, 2018

Unconference

8:00 am to 9:00 am
Grand Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

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Unconference

8:00 am to 11:45 am
Grand Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

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Doing Teacher Education in the Park: New York City's Central Park as a Pedagogical Space and a Space of Pedagogy

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Columbus IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Timothy Patterson, Temple University

Doing Teacher Education in the Park: New York City's Central Park as a Pedagogical Space and a Space of Pedagogy


Discussant:

The symposium on space, curriculum and social studies comprises four papers centered on Central Park, specifically: (1) a broad approach for thinking about space and curriculum; (2) how social inquiry was enacted by a group of teacher-educators; (3) anxiety produced by the use of social inquiry; and (4) teacher education.
William Gaudelli, Teachers College, Columbia University; Avner Segall, Michigan State University; Sandra J. Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University; Patrick Keegan, New York University

31

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Family Dis/Connections: Reimagining School-Based Family History Research in Response to Colonial Contexts

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Columbus CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Family Dis/Connections: Reimagining School-Based Family History Research in Response to Colonial Contexts


Discussant:

This symposium unsettles the norms and assumptions of genealogy projects in U.S. social studies classrooms by reflecting on the experiences of Indigenous students and teachers and proposes new epistemological groundings for such projects in regards to kinship, family and societal structure, archival access, and land.
Meredith McCoy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland; Lakota Pearl Pochedley, Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi; Leilani Sabzalian, University of Oregon

27

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Race and Civic Myths: Troubling Patriotism, Civic Altruism, and the American Dream

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Columbus EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Christine Stanton, Montana State University

This is a story of who America is: Utilizing cultural memories as the foundation to Black civic identity


Discussant:Jane Lo, Florida State University

This qualitative study investigates how preservice elementary teachers crafted narratives of their family's history during the Great Migration. Using an Endarkened feminist framework, the author examines the process in which two African American preservice teachers (re)membered their family history and cultural memories as a foundation to civic identity formation.
Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University

28

Patriotism as Critique: Students' Thoughts on their Country and the Critical Teaching of U.S. History


Discussant:,

This ethnographic study examines students' attitudes toward patriotism and their country in the context of two critical U.S. History classrooms. Contrary to beliefs that critique of country instills disaffection in students, critical teaching actually enhanced students' drive to make their country more just, particularly with students from historically marginalized groups.
Hillary Parkhouse, Virginia Commonwealth University

28

Whose American story: Two self-studies of unsettling national myths and civic identities in university classrooms


Discussant:,

This paper's authors unsettle their students' understandings of the United States history and contemporary issues. Engaged in self-study of their teaching in education and transdisciplinary courses, the authors analyze how they and their students deconstruct and reconstruct specific ways of thinking and teaching about the U.S. and American identities
Mark Helmsing, George Mason University; Sarah Shear, Pennsylvania State University-Altoona

28

America and the myth: Hip-Hop Based Education and the possibilities for disruption in economics


Discussant:,

The notion of the American dream is a prevalent theme within the K-12 economics curriculum. The realization of this dream has been elusive for m

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SCUFF Session-Expanding the Intellectual Contours of Social Studies Education

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Scott Dewitt, Knox College

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The Emancipatory Potential of Practitioner Research in the Social Studies

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Columbus G, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Meghan Manfra, NC State University

The Emancipatory Potential of Practitioner Research in the Social Studies


Discussant:

This symposium explores the emancipatory potential of practitioner inquiry in the social studies. Practitioner inquiry addresses the socio-cultural issues confronting social studies teaching and learning. By engaging with practitioners as researchers, we can empower our field with insider knowledge and democratize access to research and the development of the knowledge base.
Meghan Manfra, NC State University; Chris Martell , Boston University; Todd Dinkleman , University of Georgia; JB Mayo , University of Minnesota; Jeff Greiner, NC State University

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The Long Tail of the Inquiry Design Model

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Columbus KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

The Long Tail of the Inquiry Design Model


Discussant:

This session focuses on the Inquiry Design Model and the work that social studies colleagues are doing that elaborate and operationalize the IDM curricular approach: 1) critical theory as a lens for IDM development; 2) research on issues teachers face developing IDM inquiries; 3) educational outreach using IDM as the foundation for instructional materials.
Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky; John Lee, NC State; SG Grant, Binghamton University; Walter Parker, University of Washington; Ryan Crowley, University of Kentucy; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri; Journell Wayne, UNC-Greensboro; Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University; Emma Thacker, JMU; Fitchett Paul, UNC-Charlotte; Ed Schupman, National Museum of the American Indian

32

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Beyond Essentialism: Narratives of Intersectionality in Social Studies Education

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Tianna Dowie-Chin, University of Florida

On the Uses of Intersectionality in Social Studies Research


Discussant:Kristen Duncan, Texas State University

This paper reviews the uses of intersectionality in social studies research, aiming to complicate prevailing understandings and uncover new opportunities for intersectional analysis. While research increasingly highlights the experiences of multiply-marginalized groups, we still need to explore how marginalization and privilege are co-constituted in social studies classrooms and curriculum.
Lisa Sibbett, University of Washington

33

Gender Issues but Bring Race into the Mix: Perceptions and Understandings of Women's Histories and Movements


Discussant:Kristen Duncan, Texas State University

We share findings of the ways in which students in a Gender and Education course conceived of, understood, and interpreted women's historical movements in the U.S. through survey and document-based questions. We conclude by sharing implications for further research and how educators might build on successes and address shortcomings.
Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas; Lauren Colley, University of Alabama

33

I got your back: Muslim Girls and Mothers (Re)telling and (Re)living Stories of Relational Resistance


Discussant:Kristen Duncan, Texas State University

Drawing from my two-year narrative inquiry (Clandinin, 2013; Clandinin & Connelly, 2000) alongside three Canadian Muslim girls and their mothers, I foreground our relational resistance to single stories (Adichie, 2009) and arrogant perceptions (Lugones, 1987) of who we are or 'should' be as Muslim females.
Muna Saleh, Concordia University of Edmonton

33

Women's History Students Learn About Race Through Historical Memoir: Anne Moody's Coming of Age in Mississippi


Discussant:Kristen Duncan, Texas State University

This project explores the impact of a women's history class unit based on the autobiography Coming of Age in Mississippi on students' un

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Creating and Situating Authentic Teaching Cases of Controversial Issues in Elementary and Middle Grades Social Studies

9:00 am to 10:15 am
Columbus H, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Creating and Situating Authentic Teaching Cases of Controversial Issues in Elementary and Middle Grades Social Studies


Discussant:

This session springboards a long-term, large-scale project connecting university and K-8 teachers. It focuses on creating digital simulations from authentic cases to provide preservice teachers practice opportunities for broaching controversial topics in classrooms. The research background, discussions on potential opportunities and constraints, and brainstorming for future collaboration will be facilitated.
Jennifer Gallagher, East Carolina University; Christina Tschida, East Carolina University; Jacob Gates, Penn State University; Sarah Pamperin, Iowa State University; Kelly Olson, Chicago Public Schools; Jenny Sinclair, Norwalk Community Schools

30

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Reconceptualizing Civic Education: Attitudes, Ideology, Identity, and Resistance in Social Studies Classrooms

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Columbus CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

H. James Garrett, University of Georgia

Reconceptualizing Civic Education: Attitudes, Ideology, Identity, and Resistance in Social Studies Classrooms


Discussant:H. James Garrett, University of Georgia

The papers in this session provide a variety of perspectives on the issue of how to reconceptualize civic education to speak to current challenges and opportunities.
Christopher Clark, University of Georgia; Ryan Knowles, Utah State University; Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University; Jane Lo, Florida State University

37

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Roundtable #1: Global Citizenship Education Research

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Jason Harshman, University of Iowa

Global Education in Neoliberal Times: A Case Study of Two New York City Area Schools


Discussant:Jason Harshman, University of Iowa

This case study investigates the conceptualizations and practices of global education (GE) in two schools. Findings include the ambiguity of GE and the various pressures that influence teacher GE practice. These themes suggest that the enactment of GE necessitates adaptation and less criticality to appease other demands on teachers.
William Gaudelli, Teachers College, Columbia University; Melissa Mitchem, Teachers College, Columbia University; Yeji Kim, Teachers College, Columbia University; Hanadi Shatara, Teachers College, Columbia University

44

Act Globally, Teach Locally: Developing an EcoJustice stance among preservice teachers through place-based, service learning


Discussant:,

This paper presents findings from a study based on a critical place-based participatory research learning experience among preservice candidates. The goals of the learning experience are to engender an EcoJustice stance and prepare candidates to provide education for sustainability. Findings provide insights to the transformational potential of such experiences.
Greer Burroughs, The College of New Jersey; Marissa Bellino, The College of New Jersey; Morgan Johnston, The College of New Jersey

44

Cosmopolitanism in the Coalfields: Educating Appalachian Youth for Global Citizenship


Discussant:,

This two-phased, mixed-methods study examined the intersection of Appalachian social studies teachers' perspectives on Global Citizenship Education (GCE) and rurality. Findings indicate participants largely supported democratically-congruent forms of GCE, but deficit thinking about rurality acted as a self-imposed hindrance to their curriculum aims.
Eric Moffa, Washington and Lee University

44

Developing Globally Competent Teacher Candidates Through Cross-Cultural Experiential Learning


Discussant:,

This research explores the

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Roundtable #2: Standards, Curriculum, and Position Statements: Cases Inclusion, Exclusion, or [Mis-]Representation

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Rebecca C. Christ, Florida International University

Where is race? A critical whiteness studies analysis of NCSS position statements


Discussant:Rebecca C. Christ, University of Missouri

This is a document analysis study that analyzed the National Council of Social Studies' position statements from 2004-2017. Critical Whiteness Studies and White Social Studies were used as analytical frameworks. Findings portray that NCSS maintains a colorblind discourse, minimizes racist legacies, and fails to name racism in its official statements.
Sara Demoiny, Auburn University

45

Against 'economic man': A feminist challenge to prevailing neoclassical norms in K-12 economics education


Discussant:,

This paper outlines core tenets of feminist economics, and contrasts these tenets with traditional neoclassical economic assumptions about human nature, value, and power. It also critiques national standards in economics for exclusively adopting the neoclassical paradigm, and offers content and pedagogy that would address the absence of feminist economics perspectives.
Neil Shanks, Unaffiliated

45

Global Citizenship, Migration, and National Curriculum: A Tale of Two Nations


Discussant:,

This study offers an analysis of Scotland and South Korea's national curriculums, paying particular attention to manifestations of global citizenship education in two unique migrant contexts. Findings indicate common nation-building rhetoric towards a homogeneous, unified culture while portraying migration and accompanying phenomena as major sources of social problems and conflicts.
Timothy Patterson, Temple University; Yoonjung Choi, Ewha Womans University

45

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Roundtable #3: Of and From: Religion and Social Studies Education

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Benjamin Jacobs, George Washington University

Teaching About Religion Within Early Childhood and Elementary Social Studies: Exploring how Preservice Teachers Perceive their Rights and Responsibilities as Educators


Discussant:,

The purpose of this empirical study is to explore the extent to which preservice teachers understand their responsibilities for teaching religion. Findings suggest that preservice teachers have neither the confidence to teach religion nor a strong enough understanding of their constitutional rights to teach religion in a non-proselytizing manner.
Rory Tannebaum, Merrimack College

46

The Power of the Savior Mentality: When Christianity Becomes Normalized in Elementary School


Discussant:Benjamin Jacobs, George Washington University

Sixty preservice teachers responded to four prompts involving the intersection of religion and schooling at the personal, curricular, policy, and societal levels. Findings indicate that whether or not preservice teachers identify public school teaching as Christian-based missionary work, they tend to take on a savior mentality that parallels these beliefs.
Aaron Bodle, James Madison University; Elizabeth Bellows, Appalachian State University

46

Teaching Religion as a Part of the Social Studies: Teacher Subjectivity, School Structures and Superstructures


Discussant:,

1) how do the subjectivities of a teacher contribute to the way he or she teaches about religion as a part of the social studies? And 2) what broader forces, both in the school setting in particular and society at large, influence teachers' pedagogical and curricular choices around this topic?
John Shekitka, Manhattanville College

46

Secondary Teacher Candidates' Experiences Teaching About Religion Within a History Curriculum


Discussant:,

This qualitative, phenomenological study examined the experience of five secondary social studies teacher candidates as they taught about religion throughout a two-semester internship in a middle or high school, soc

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When White Supremacist Perspectives Become One of the 'Multiple' Perspectives: Teacher Educators of Color Engaging during Troubling Times in the U.S. South

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Columbus EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

When White Supremacist Perspectives Become One of the 'Multiple' Perspectives: Teacher Educators of Color Engaging During Troubling Times in the U.S. South


Discussant:

Multiethnic teacher educators use narrative inquiry to share our dilemmas of teaching social studies that are pervasively challenged by reignited white supremacist ideologies in U.S. South. The audience will be invited to discuss their own dilemmas to generate possibilities for teacher educators in such troubling pedagogical times.
Kristen Duncan, Texas State University; Jesus Tirado, University of Georgia; Natasha Murray Everett, West Virginia University; Delandrea Hall, The University of Texas at Austin; Melissa Rojas Williams, The University of Texas at Austin

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Expanding the Curricular & Intellectual Contours of Social Studies: A Conversation on Ethnic Studies and Social Studies Education

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Christopher L. Busey, University of Florida

Expanding the Curricular & Intellectual Contours of Social Studies: A Conversation on Ethnic Studies and Social Studies Education


Discussant:

A featured CUFA 2018 session on ethnic studies and social studies education.
Angela Valenzuela, University of Texas; Binaya Subedi, Ohio State University; Noreen Naseem Rodriguez, Iowa State University; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri; Ashley Woodson, University of Missouri; Lakota Pochedley, Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi; Leilani Sanzalian, University of Oregon; Sarah Shear, Penn State University-Altoona

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Lesson Study in Social Studies: Promises and Challenges

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Columbus G, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Jada Kohlmeier, Auburn University

Lesson Study in Social Studies: Promises and Challenges


Discussant:Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University

This symposium will discuss findings from a range of professional development efforts using lesson study with social studies teachers in a variety of settings. Each paper will report the research methodology used in the lesson-study project, the results of the effort, and questions warranting future study.
Jada Kohlmeier, Auburn University; Cory Callahan, University of Alabama; James B. Howell, University of Southern Mississippi; Lamont E. Maddox, University of North Alabama; Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University; Lauren McArthur Harris, Arizona State University; Linda Doornbos, Michigan State University; Matthew T. Missias, Cultivated Learning

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Nuancing Discourses on Gender and Sexuality in Social Studies Education

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Columbus IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Bretton A. Varga, University of South Florida

Analyzing a District's Gender and Sexuality Professional Development


Discussant:Ginney Norton, University of Arkansas

Exploring one school district's professional development (PD) on LGBTQ issues, this study finds the PD led to no change in opinions or actions. Tenets from Critical Race Theory (Ladson-Billings, 1998) may be one avenue for social studies teacher leaders to bring a critical approach to make PD more effective.
Daniel Bordwell, University of Minnesota

41

Engaging Two Spirit knowledge while deconstructing the gender binary in one social studies classroom


Discussant:,

An exploration of Two Spirit people (their beliefs and lived experiences) offers social studies teachers and students a window through which to view and better understand non-binary genders. This paper investigates how one white, cis-male teacher engaged his white, working class students, helping them to think beyond the gender binary.
J.B. Mayo, University of Minnesota

41

Disrupting Social Studies Teaching through LGBTQ identity: A case study of social studies teachers and the enactment of counter stories/narratives.


Discussant:,

This qualitative study explores how social studies teacher's disrupt and rethink LGBTQ history in the classroom and how they use their pedagogical practices and ideological framing to teach LGBTQ history.
Steven Montemayor, The University of Texas at Austin

41

Navigating Controversial Identity Issues for Students and Teachers: One Gay Teacher's Disclosure and Participation during the National Day of Silence


Discussant:,

This study explores teacher disclosure and controversial identity issues (Journell, 2017) relevant to student and teacher identities through one gay teacher's implicit stance and silent instructional moves supporting student discussion during the national Day of Silence, an event marking the silencing and erasure of LGBTQ people in schools.
Jenni Conrad, University of Washington

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Perspectives on Social Studies Teacher Education

10:30 am to 11:45 am
Columbus H, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Erin Adams, Kennesaw State University

Hidden in Plain Sight: Museum Educators Role in Social Studies Teacher Professional Development


Discussant:,

This paper reports on Y2/3-year project to assess historic site-based teacher PD programs. Exceptionally large shifts in teacher experiences from Y1 were attributable to changes instigated by Y1 assessment. Herein we examine the influence of the assessment on museum educators' conceptual understanding of their roles as social studies teacher educators.
Christine Baron, Teachers College, Columbia University; Sherri Sklarwitz, Tufts University; Hyeyoung Bang, Bowling Green State University; Nicholas Coddington, Teachers College, Columbia University

40

What should I teach? Examining a methods exercise for making subject matter choices


Discussant:,

Scholars stress the importance of strengthening novice teachers' subject matter knowledge within the context of teaching, but few studies investigate the impact of specific strategies. Motivated by experiences with our own teacher candidates, this qualitative action research study investigated the impact of a researcher-designed task on participants' content choices.
Rebecca Mueller, University of South Carolina Upstate; Emma Thacker, James Madison University; Lauren Colley, University of Alabama

40

Towards a Practice-Based Framework of Teaching for Justice: Interactive Read-Alouds and Deliberation


Discussant:,

This paper argues for the need to more clearly envision a practice-based, justice-oriented, approach to social studies teacher education. We engaged in a critical reflective process to identify two high leverage practices (HLPs) within social studies education, interactive read alouds and facilitating class deliberations, that emphasize teaching for social justice.
Marie Heath, Loyola University Maryland

40

Fad or Future?: Core Practices in Social Studies Teacher Education


Discussant:Kristy Brugar, University of Oklahoma

The latest calls for teacher educatio

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Java Literature Lunches

11:50 am to 1:50 pm

   

On Your Own

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Roundtable #1: Curriculum Theorizing Social Studies Education

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Lance Mason, Indiana University Kokomo

Bringing out the dead: Engaging with death and corporeality in social studies education


Discussant:Lance Mason, Indiana University Kokomo

This paper examines how social studies education makes use of death, specifically the bodies of deceased persons. The authors apply critical theories of death and violence to think through pedagogical implications of the figure of the corpse drawn from examples of social studies curriculum in Canada and the United States
Mark Helmsing, George Mason University; Cathryn van Kessel, University of Alberta

56

(Refusing) Work: Teaching about immaterial labor in the intangible economy


Discussant:,

Using two concepts from theorist Maurizio Lazzarato, immaterial labor and refusal of work, I interrogate the concept of work in social studies education scholarship and in K-5 classrooms. I conclude that work in schools is related to the impetus to always be employed, which is a form of government.
Erin Adams, Kennesaw State University

56

Ghosts in the Curriculum: Social Studies Education and the Spectral Turn


Discussant:,

The author explores the conceptual metaphor of ghosts/haunting, linked to Derrida's concept of hauntology, in order to investigate issues related to representational justice, sources of historical inquiry, and theorization of the future and as a means to consider new areas of social studies research.
Adam Schmitt, University of Southern Maine

56

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Roundtable #2: Expanding the Boundaries of Social Studies Teacher Education

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Karen Burgard, Texas A&M University - San Antonio

Can Preservice Social Studies Teachers Create a Student-Centered Classroom?


Discussant:,

The purpose of this study was to explore what students' perceptions were of their classroom experience with their social studies preservice teacher. Through descriptive statistical analysis, this study found that secondary social studies students experienced a student-centered classroom the most, while they experienced cultivation of a classroom community the least.
Sarah Kaka, Ohio Wesleyan University

57

Preparing Prospective Teachers across the History Department and the School of Education: Intersecting the Worlds of History and Education


Discussant:,

Although prospective teachers take both history and education courses, researchers have rarely studied these in conjunction as places of professional preparation. Through following prospective teachers in both history and education classes, this study investigates the dual role historians and teacher educators play in helping prospective teachers learn both disciplinary content and concepts and pedagogical practices.
Jared McBrady, University of Saint Francis

57

Breaking out of academic silos to prepare teacher candidates to teach at the intersections of social studies standards, UDL,CRT, and civic engagement for social justice.


Discussant:,

We examine the effect of a transdisciplinary, collaborative faculty approach to teaching social studies methods, constructing and supporting teacher candidates' capacities to practice effective teaching at the intersections of Culturally Responsive Teaching, Universal Design for Learning, state social studies curricula, social studies teaching strategies, and civic engagement for social justice.
Anneliese Worster, Salem State University School of Education; Leigh Rohde, Salem State University School of Education

57

I never thought about science as being part of social studies: Enriching content knowledge and pedagogy through an interdisciplinary

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Roundtable #3: Teacher Reflections and Research on Social Studies Praxis

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Melissa Gibson, Marquette University College of Education

The Power of Moolelo: Narrative Portraits of Wise and Ambitious Social Studies Teachers


Discussant:,

Through their own moolelo (story), this paper details five effective social studies teachers' beliefs and practices. These moolelo are used to illuminate the characteristics, beliefs, and pedagogical skills effective teachers used to expand the intellectual contours of social studies education in troubling times.
Jyoti Castillo, Washington Middle School/University of Hawai'i at Manoa

58

Beyond Theory Practice Gap: Dialogical Praxis and Critical Social Studies Teaching


Discussant:,

We propose a dialogical teaching framework contextualizing how dialogue occurs within critical social studies teacher pedagogy. Participant teachers moved between what we term skills based dialogue, critical dialogue, and critically transformational dialogue to deconstruct normed interpretations of social alienation, incorporating, addressing and transforming race, power, and politics as praxis.
Kevin Magill, Baylor Univeristy; Brooke Blevins, Baylor Univeristy

58

Bringing Voices into the Rural Classroom: Rural Social Studies Teachers struggles to introduce diverse perspectives into their white rural classrooms


Discussant:,

The study examines how two rural teachers in a conservative, white school district try to provide different perspectives to their students through classroom discussion. This case study profiles the teachers struggle to introduce different voices into their classrooms that challenge the typical student consensus.
Jason Williamson, University of Missouri

58

Using Video-Stimulated Recall to Understand The Contents of Ambitious History Teachers' Reflections


Discussant:Melissa Gibson, Marquette University College of Education

In this interpretive case study, the researcher examined the reflections of four ambitious history teachers in a high-poverty school district. The study found: The teachers reflected on the incl

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Roundtable #4: New Dialogues on Civic Education

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Thomas Lucey, Illinois State University

Dewey and disability: Extending the conception of citizenship


Discussant:Thomas Lucey, Illinois State University

There is need of more philosophical reflection focused on extending common conceptions of citizenship. In this paper, I argue that in a Deweyan pluralistic, participatory, and communicative democracy, all students, especially students with disabilities, have the capacity to be active participants in their educational pursuits.
Ricky Mullins, Virginia Tech

59

World History's Civic Purpose: An Investigation into Global Citizenship Discourse and World History's Place in Civic Education


Discussant:,

This conceptual paper considers the intersections between civic education and world history, assessing how global citizenship discursive lenses may reinforce or undermine desired disciplinary purposes. Drawing on components of history education, world history, and global citizenship education scholarship, this paper investigates how world history can contribute to meaningful civic education.
Carly Muetterties, University of Kentucky

59

Individuality as Intersectionality: How Cuban Pre-Service Social Studies Teachers and Teacher Educators Reconcile Official Civic Norms


Discussant:,

This paper investigates Cuban social studies teacher educator and pre-service teacher views on good citizenship. It draws upon the influences of lo informal (informality) and generational change to show how pre-service teachers mitigate their competing responsibilities to state-sponsored citizenship norms against expanded definitions of what it means to be Cuban.
Jenny Dawley-Carr, Northeastern Illinois University

59

Teaching and Learning Culturally and Linguistically Relevant Citizenship Education for Late Arrival Newcomer Students


Discussant:,

This paper examines the pedagogical applications of culturally and linguistically relevant citizenship education (CLRCE) for late arrival newcomer students. The implemented pedagogies offe

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Social Studies Education and Race, Part II: Critical Conversations in Teacher Education

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Columbus EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Hillary Parkhouse, Virginia Commonwealth University

Social studies teacher educators who do race work: A racial-pedagogical-content-knowledge analysis


Discussant:,

This qualitative interview study explores how eleven social studies teacher educators (SSTEs) incorporated race into their methods courses. Racial-Pedagogical-Content-Knowledge is used as an analytical framework in the study. Findings portray how the SSTEs developed counter-narrative content knowledge, modeled pedagogical content knowledge, and cultivated a working racial knowledge among pre-service teachers.
Sara Demoiny, Auburn University

50

Teaching about Racism through Counterstories of School Segregation


Discussant:,

This paper presents findings from a larger action research in which the teacher educator/researcher modeled a series of lessons on doing race on social studies topics and explored its impact on elementary preservice teachers' emergent critical racial knowledge. The specific focus is on the intervention lesson on school segregation.
sohyun an, Kennesaw State University

50

Beyond colorblind?: Shifting conceptions of white social studies teacher identity.


Discussant:John Broome, University of Mary Washington

Is it possible for pre-service social studies teachers to transform their conceptions of race? This mixed-methods study focused on two white male pre-service social studies teachers and their increasing racial awareness and cultural competence as they grappled with issues of whiteness in a multicultural education class.
Dean Vesperman, Luther College; Jill Leet-Otley, Luther College; Jeannette Pillsbury, Luther College

50

They're dressed like regular people: Critical race film literacy in elementary teacher education


Discussant:,

Authors explore their use of critical race film literacy in an elective elementary teacher education course. Findings indicate the necessity to support the development preservice teachers' sense of critical race film literacy, racial pedagogical content

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They Don't Know What They Don't Know: Navigating Elementary Preservice Teachers' Struggle for Content Knowledge

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Columbus KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

They don't know what they don't know: Navigating elementary preservice teachers' struggle for content knowledge


Discussant:

Preservice teachers' lack of social studies content knowledge and inaccurate social studies understandings present significant challenges in our teaching. This session will revive these timely concerns as they relate to the aims of social justice and anti-oppressive education, the uncovering of counternarratives via historical inquiry, and practices of critical pedagogy.
Elizabeth Bellows, Appalachian State University; Christina Tschida, East Carolina University; Elizabeth Saylor, University of Georgia; Lisa Brown Buchanan, The University of North Carolina Wilmington; Sarah Shear, Pennsylvania State University-Altoona; Jeannette Alarcn, The University of North Carolina, Greensboro; Pratigya Christy Marhatta, The University of North Carolina, Greensboro

54

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Constructivism and the New Social Studies: A Collection of Classic Inquiry Lessons

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Columbus G, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Constructivism and the New Social Studies: A Collection of Classic Inquiry Lessons


Discussant:

Book discussion on (Book Title) examining the legacy of New Social Studies through the lens of original curricular materials. Contributors reflect on historical efforts to promote inquiry learning, especially in light of constructivist theories. Panelists include developers, participants, and users of NSS lessons. Emphasis on audience participation.
Geoffrey Scheurman, University of Wisconsin - River Falls; Ronald Evans, San Diego State University; Carole Hahn, Emory University; S.G. Grant, Binghamton University; Peter Dow, First Hand Learning

51

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Unconference

2:00 pm to 4:45 pm
Grand Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

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Fake News: Why It Is Problematic and What We Can Do about It

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Jeremy Stoddard, College of William and Mary

Fake News: Why It Is Problematic and What We Can Do About It


Discussant:Jeremy Stoddard, College of William and Mary

Since the 2016 election, fake news has become part of the cultural lexicon. Authors of a forthcoming edited volume will facilitate dialogues on various aspects of how actual fake news is damaging American civic discourse, as well as how social studies educators can address this problem in their classrooms.
Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Christopher Clark, University of Georgia; Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University; Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University; Erica Hodgin, University of California, Riverside; Jim Garrett, University of Georgia; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri; Avner Segall, Michigan State University; Jeremy Stoddard, College of William and Mary; Ashley Woodson, University of Missouri; Sarah McGrew, Stanford University; Joel Breakstone, Stanford University

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Global Education and the Geopolitics of Epistemology

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Columbus CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Gabriel Swarts, University of Wyoming

The Influence of Teacher Positionalities on the Teaching of Global Education


Discussant:,

This study investigates how world history teachers' positionalities influence their curricular and pedagogical decision-making. Findings include the significance of personal experiences with family and travel in practice and the participants' ways of including their positions in their teaching. Various constraints and pressures affected their incorporation of a critical global perspective.
Hanadi Shatara, Teachers College, Columbia University

49

Moving Towards the Inclusion of Global Content Knowledge to Advance Global Learning?


Discussant:,

Content standards in two countries were reviewed to determine their alignment to one United Nations' Sustainable Development Goal, #5: Gender Equality. This was done to consider the SDGs as a prospective global content knowledge framework. The authors found little direct content alignment and note its implications for global educators.
Brad Maguth, The University of Akron; Yang Huiyong, Henan University

49

Critical Readings of Global Citizenship in Teacher Education from the Global South


Discussant:,

This paper reports on the perspectives of university faculty in Turkey and South Africa regarding global citizenship within teacher education. Data reveal how the intersections of religion, race, place, and globalization inform anti-colonial readings of GCE and the need to attend to privilege and one's security of belonging before claiming the global.
Jason Harshman, University of Iowa

49

Unsettling Globally Oriented Social Studies Classrooms: Understanding Teachers' Practices, Resources and Tensions in Centering Indigenous Ways of Knowing & Pedagogies


Discussant:Gabriel Swarts, University of Wyoming

This comparative case study explores the diverse urban contexts and curricula of two secondary social studies teachers nominated by local Indigenous people, asking: How can experienced teach

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Interrumpiendo Las Fronteras De Epistemologas, Ontologas, Y Lenguajes en Los Estudios Sociales

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Columbus IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Interrumpiendo las fronteras de epistemologas, ontologas, y lenguajes en los estudios sociales


Discussant:

En esta sesin, presentamos nuestros estudios investigativos y/o pensamientos tericos para provocar reflexin y dilogo acerca de las posibilidades existentes en el campo de estudios sociales, enfocndonos en varias preguntas pertinente a las comunidades latinas / hispanas / indgenas / de habla hispana y comunidades aliadas.
Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland; Rebecca Christ, University of Missouri; Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University; Ana Carolina Diaz Beltran, The Pennsylvania State University; Aubrey Southall, Aurora University; Gerardo Aponte-Martinez, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; Yianella Blanco, Teachers College, Columbia University

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Resistance, Activism, and Agency in Social Studies Education

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Columbus H, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Diana Fidaoui, Syracuse University

Youth-Led Self-Determination: Indigenous Storywork in the Digital Age


Discussant:Sarah King, University of New Brunswick

Despite settler-colonial efforts to disrupt cultural education, Indigenous peoples have sustained their identities. This study highlights a partnership between reservation youth and university faculty and students. Through the Digital Storywork Partnership, Indigenous students lead research, filmmaking, and educational experiences to explore questions surrounding self-determination, citizenship, sovereignty, and identity.
Christine Stanton, Montana State University

52

El Pueblo Unido: University Faculty and Student Activism in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala's Coyuntura Estudiantil


Discussant:,

This paper documents the experiences of faculty and student participants in the Renuncia Ya movement in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. Participants indicated that the autonomy granted to a local university, the faculty's embrace of critical pedagogy, and a tradition of student leadership were influential developing the leadership that initiated the anti-corruption movement that arose in 2015.
Chris Lemley, Baylor University

52

Citizenship Education Beyond P-16: Self-Directed Learning in Online Communities


Discussant:,

Following the 2016 presidential election in the United States, resistance movements began to organize online (Holland, 2017). Reporting on national survey data, this study explores who participates in online social media activist groups, why they participate, and what they learn about citizenship as a result of their participation.
Stephanie Schroeder, Penn State University; Lisa Lundgren, University of Florida; Shelly Curcio, University of South Carolina; Elizabeth Currin, University of Florida; Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida

52

Teaching Power: The Role of Civic Agency and Social Justice in the Social Studies Classroom


Discussant:,

In this action research study, the researcher explored what

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Roundtable #1: Global Perspectives on Teaching and Curriculum

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Crystal Anderson, Cabrini University

Teach or Not Teach: Teachers' Curricular-Instructional Decision Making of Controversial Public Issues


Discussant:Crystal Anderson, Cabrini University

This study is aimed at exploring how teachers' curricular-instructional making of teaching contemporary controversial public issues in Taiwan. Using a case study design, this study's findings illuminate that teachers' personal practical knowledgefamily background and teacher preparation--are important factors that influence teachers' decision making. In addition, teachers' curricular-instructional decisions reflects increased autonomy and authority of teachers.
Yu-Han Hung, University of Houston- Downton

68

Interrogating inequality: A transdisciplinary study of social studies curricula in two global cities


Discussant:,

This comparative investigation draws on global citizenship education and curriculum studies to examine curriculum portrayals of inequality in Hong Kong and Singapore. Cross-analyses suggest curricula insufficiently prepare students to understand the global and systemic nature of inequality. We implicate findings to teacher education within the context of neoliberal education reforms.
Theresa Alviar-Martin, Kennesaw State University; Mark Baildon, National Institute of Education

68

Victims or Competitors: Korean Students' Competing Understandings of Migrants


Discussant:,

This study investigates how ethnic Korean students perceive migrants by interviewing 21 adolescents. It shows parallels of the media discourse with students' discourse. Reflecting competing media discourses, half of the students relied on the humanitarian discourse, while another half showed the anti-multicultural discourse. School learning was the least meaningful source of information to Korean students.
Jiyoung Kang, Indiana University

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Roundtable #2: Thinking and Inquiring about History

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida

Developing A Planning Framework for Effective Historical Inquiry


Discussant:Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida

This study examines the benefits and challenges of doing historical inquiry in K-12 classrooms through an analysis of existing literature and semi-structured interviews with expert history teachers (n=11). We propose a planning framework for historical inquiry that accentuates the benefits of historical inquiry and provides potential solutions to ongoing challenges.
James Miles, University of Toronto, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education; Lindsay Gibson, University of Alberta

69

An Expert/Novice/Novice Comparison of Social Interactions during Document-Based History Lessons


Discussant:,

We observed small groups of fifth grade, eighth grade, eleventh grade, undergraduate students, and historians, while engaged in a collaborative analysis of primary sources associated with a historical investigation. We identified social interactions that distinguish more successful from less successful groups, with instructional implications and potential implications for civic preparation.
Jeffery Nokes, Brigham Young University; Alisa Kesler-Lund, Brigham Young University

69

Students' use of data visualizations in historical reasoning: A think-aloud investigation with elementary, middle, and high school students


Discussant:,

This study investigates the role that data visualizations play in historical reasoning. Twenty-seven students were asked to think aloud about a historical question while using a textbook entry. Students tended to ignore the text's data visualization on their own, but historical reasoning improved by using the data visualization.
Tamara Shreiner, Grand Valley State University

69

Internet as archive: Expertise in searching for digital sources on a contentious historical question


Discussant:,

Fact checkers, historians, and Stanford University students thought aloud while completing Intern

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Roundtable #3: Teacher Beliefs and Teacher Perceptions

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Mark Kissling, Penn State University

Surveying Pennsylvania Social Studies Teachers About (Teaching) Environmental Issues


Discussant:,

As the current U.S. presidential administration shows little-to-no concern about climate change and other major environmental issues, how are social studies teachers thinking and teaching about these issues? This paper presents the results of an online survey in October of 2017 of over 1200 public-school social studies teachers across Pennsylvania.
Mark Kissling, Penn State University; Jonathan Bell, Penn State University

70

The Relationship between Teachers' Beliefs about Migration and Their Attitudes towards Immigrant Students


Discussant:Mark Kissling, Penn State University

An analysis of a nationwide quantitative study of K-12 teachers (n=5190) reveals the strong relationship between beliefs about borders and migration and attitudes towards educational rights for marginalized immigrant students. This paper will outline the data behind this study and the possible implications for teachers and teacher educators.
William McCorkle, Clemson University; Sophia Rodriguez, University of North Carolina-Greensboro; Tim Monreal, University of South Carolina

70

Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions about Master and Counter Narratives in the Curriculum


Discussant:,

How do teachers utilize racial pedagogical content knowledge to manipulate benchmarks for the teaching of racial violence? This paper presents a study of history teachers use of RPCK to grapple with curricular standards.
Travis L. Seay, University of Florida

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The Praxis of Civic Education

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Columbus KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Erin Casey, Louisiana State University

Developing Civic Competence: A Longitudinal Examination of an Action Civics Project


Discussant:Erin Casey, Louisiana State University

We describe student outcomes an action civics program designed to increase students' civic and political competence and engagement. Using analysis from four years of survey data, this paper presents findings related to changes in students' civic competence as a result of participating in the program, including findings related to both first time and repeat campers.
Brooke Blevins, Baylor University; Karon LeCompte, Baylor University; Chris Lemley, Baylor University; Nate Scholten, Baylor University

66

Liberation Psychology and Urban Civic Education


Discussant:,

This paper uses theories of liberation psychology to analyze an urban middle school civic engagement project that illustrates the possibility of fostering students' character development in this case, what the teacher and students called positivity while supporting their broader social understandings and commitment to a collective good.
Shira Epstein, The City College of New York (CUNY)

66

Iterative Digital Art Making as Community Civic Engagement


Discussant:,

Research on civic education finds government courses ignore lived experiences of youth of color in favor of government systems focus. This study finds the creation of an interactive digital mural to provide multiple opportunities for youth of color to engage in authentic civic engagement by instantiating their lived experiences
Jamie Gravell, UCLA

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Traveling beyond 90 Feet to Home: How the BASE-Chicago Encourages Active Student Citizenship

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Columbus CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Traveling Beyond 90 Feet to Home: How the BASE-Chicago Encourages Active Student Citizenship


Discussant:

The BASE-Chicago is a community-based non-profit organization that works to redefine urban citizenship and advocates a mindset of active citizenship through baseball. Since January 2018, the authors and the Executive Director of The BASE-Chicago have collaborated in developing objectives that reimagine pathways to active citizenship that reflect the C3 Framework.
Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland; Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University

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Using Children's Literature to Teach Powerful and Purposeful Elementary Social Studies

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Columbus EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Katy Swalwell, Iowa State University

Using Children's Literature to Teach Powerful and Purposeful Elementary Social Studies


Discussant:Andrea Libresco, Hofstra University

This symposium explores the use of children's literature in elementary classrooms and how such texts offer diverse narratives and representations traditionally omitted from social studies curriculum. Five sets of presenters highlight different set of children's literature, analyzing the texts themselves or their application with elementary students and/or pre-service teachers.
Noreen Rodriguez, Iowa State University; Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University; Delandrea Hall, The University of Texas at Austin; Christina Tschida, East Carolina University; Lisa Buchanan, University of North Carolina - Wilmington; Esther Kim, The University of Texas at Austin; Anna Falkner, The University of Texas at Austin; Dan Krutka, University of North Texas; Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University

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Controversial Issues and Difficult Dialogues: Democratic Pedagogy in an Era of Polarization

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Columbus H, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University, Brooklyn

Accommodating the Role of Emotion and Affect in Classroom-based Political Discussion and Deliberation


Discussant:Patricia Avery, University of Minnesota

This paper builds on the authors' empirical research and transdisciplinary literature to challenge assumptions and approaches currently underlying social studies' approach toward discussions and deliberations on public issues. The authors present three ways of exploring and accommodating the role of affect and emotion in social studies education.
H. James Garrett, University of Georgia; Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University; Avner Segall, Michigan State University

64

Affective Listening: Conceptualizing a Silent Skill and the Democratic Orientations it Fosters


Discussant:,

The skill of listening is a vital but elusive democratic competency. Drawing upon scholarly literature and a recent civic education study, we conceptualize the democratic orientations that affective listening fosters. We propose mechanisms to measure both the outcomes of affective listening and the process by which these outcomes are cultivated.
Hilary Conklin, DePaul University; Molly Andolina, DePaul University

64

Designing for Difficult Discourses: Using Simulated Encounters in a Social Studies Literacies Teacher Education Course


Discussant:,

This paper reports on and analyzes a three-year effort that used live-actor simulated encounters to enable teachers to confront the complexity of engaging in difficult discourses in the social studies classroom, specifically when exploring judicial decisions that have (re)shaped the social landscape of our nation.
Elizabeth Self, Vanderbilt University; Andrew Hostetler, Vanderbilt University; Barbara Stengel, Vanderbilt University

64

Learning to Teach Controversial Issues in Troubling Times


Discussant:,

This qualitative research project on learning to teach controversial issues was conducted in Northern Ireland, England, and the United States. It analyz

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Critical Research Methodologies and Representation in Social Studies Research

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Columbus IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Sandra J. Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University

Critical research methodologies and representation in social studies research


Discussant:Sandra J. Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University

This symposium addresses the goal of preserving the personhood of marginalized peoples as subjects in social studies research through an examination of three critical qualitative research methodologies: portraiture, auto-ethnography, and critical visual research. Each presenter will explain how they navigate their position as insiders/outsiders to represent their participants to various audiences.
Patrick Keegan, New York University; Christina Villarreal, Teachers College, Columbia University; Tadashi Dozono, New York City Department of Education

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Digging up and Digging through the Literature: Social Studies Research as a Site for Excavation

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Columbus G, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Lisa Sibbett, University of Washington

Against the Hegemony of Idealism: The Rise of materialist theories of race and racism in Theory Research and Social Education


Discussant:,

This review of literature from Theory Research and Social Education illustrates the growth of materialist approaches to race and racism in theorizing citizenship and democracy in education. Findings demonstrate that materialist approaches disrupt idealist conventions of citizenship and democracy that perpetuate racism and open the field to redefining these concepts.
Ryan Oto, University of Minnesota

63

Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Social Studies Instruction for English Language Learners: Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Research and Pedagogical Practices


Discussant:Lisa Sibbett, University of Washington

Teaching social studies for elementary and secondary English Language Learners (ELLs) requires critical attention to students' cultural, linguistic, and civic knowledge and experiences. This paper draws on theoretical frameworks and literature from social studies and language acquisition scholars to introduce transdisciplinary perspectives on research and pedagogical practices.
Ashley Taylor Jaffee, James Madison University; Paul Yoder, Eastern Mennonite University

63

Online and Technology-Mediated Learning in K-12 Social Studies


Discussant:,

This meta-analysis study summarizes and synthesizes findings from research focused on social studies instruction in online and blended learning environments. Limiting our examination to studies published in peer-reviewed journals in the last three years (2014-present) allows for a synthesis of the most recent and relevant trends in research.
Tina Heafner, UNC Charlotte; Laura Handler, UNC Charlotte

63

Call it like it is: A critical race theory examination of bullying in social studies curriculum


Discussant:,

Using critical race theory to challenge the definitions of bullying, this paper seeks to assist social studies teachers t

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Issues, Trends, and Future Visions for Social Studies Education: A Chat with Journal and Book Series Editors

3:30 pm to 4:45 pm
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas

Issues, Trends, and Future Visions for Social Studies Education: A Chat with Journal and Book Series Editors


Discussant:Michael Milton, Dan Krutka, Visions of Ed Podcast

Journal and book series editors will discuss current trends and future visions for social studies education research. Session recorded by Visions of Ed Podcast.
Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina Greensboro; Paul Fitchett, UNC Charlotte; Anthony Brown, University of Texas; William Russell III, University of Central Florida; Stewart Waters, University of Tennessee Knoxville; Cynthia Sunal, University of Alabama; Jessica Zolotsky, Penn State Berks; Sarah Brooks, Millersville University; Brad Maguth, University of Akron; Todd Hawley, Kent State University; Scott Waring, University of Central Florida

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Closing Keynote-Dr. Angela Valenzuela

5:00 pm to 6:00 pm
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

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CUFA Business Meeting

6:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower
   

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CUFA Closing Reception

6:45 pm to 8:30 pm
Crystal Ballroom BC, Lobby Level, West Tower
   

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Thursday, November 29, 2018