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Whiteness and White Dominance in Social Studies Education

Wed Nov 28 4:00 pm to 5:15 pm
Room: 
Columbus EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Travis Seay, University of Florida

Social Studies Needs (New) White People: The Case for Including Allies in the Curriculum


Discussant:Christopher Martell, Boston University

In this conceptual paper, we consider the possibilities and pitfalls of incorporating White-ally figures in social studies curricula. Situating our argument within existing race-and-social-studies scholarship, we contend that White-ally pedagogy can provide White students in particular a much-needed positive racial identity. We close with guidelines for educators and teacher educators.
William L. Smith, University of Arizona; Ryan M. Crowley, University of Kentucky; Carly C. Muetterties, University of Kentucky

14

All White Everything: An Investigation into the Educational Resources of the National Women's History Museum


Discussant:Christopher Martell, Boston University

Following the report on state standards from the National Women's History Museum, this study investigated the extent to which the museum's online educational resources sustained a dominant narrative of whiteness. Findings indicate that when women of color are included, they are separated from the narratives of white women.
Lauren Colley, University of Alabama; John Broome, University of Mary Washington

14

Figured Worlds and Whiteness: Exploring Anti-Racism in Social Studies Teacher Education


Discussant:,

In this study, the author examines the figured world constructed within a social studies methods course infused with attention to race/ism, whiteness, and white supremacy. Participants demonstrate a fluidity of racial literacy and positioning as they invest, reinvest, and divest from whiteness. Implications for teacher education are discussed.
Andrea Hawkman, Utah State University

14

Memorializing Whiteness in State Standards and Local History: A Critical Sociohistorical Consciousness Analysis of Southern Racial Violence


Discussant:,

This paper examines the historical and modern treatment of the Wilmington Coup

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