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Resisting the Master Script: Black, Latinx, and Caribbean Perspectives Towards History Education

Wed Nov 28 4:00 pm to 5:15 pm
Room: 
Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Nafees Khan, Clemson University

From Multicultural to Romanticized Representations of the Past: The Role of Contemporary Context on the Teaching of Latinx History


Discussant:Eliana Castro, Michigan State University

This paper focuses on how one historical event, Mendez v. Westminster, becomes curricularized. I document how the narrative evolves from a complex historical event to a romanticized story of Latinx exceptionality. Creating these feel-good stories of Latinx excellence come at the expense of historical and racial complexity.
Maribel Santiago, Michigan State University

19

Making Our Mark: A Historiographical Sketch of Primary and Secondary Black History in the US, 1900-1950


Discussant:Eliana Castro, Michigan State University

This paper presents a historiographical sketch of US primary and secondary Black history education between 1900 and 1950 by engaging racial realism (Bell,1992a) and master-narratives (Aldridge, 2006). Ultimately, I argue that the historiography of Black history education can be clarified by accepting racism as a permanent feature of US society.
ArCasia James, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign

19

Framing Race Talk in World History Classrooms: A Case Study of the Haitian Revolution


Discussant:Eliana Castro, Michigan State University

In this proposal, we focus on ways to structure racial discourses in world history classrooms, using the Haitian Revolution as a case study. We use the patterns of racial hierarchy as a conceptual framework to support world history teachers in leading conversations about race as a historical and global construct.
Ashley Woodson, University of Missouri; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri

19

Professional Development to Disrupt Generalizations and Misperceptions of Latin America and the Caribbean: #LittleHaiti


Discussant:Eliana Castro, Michigan State University

This presentation highlight results of a professional development workshop that disrupted stereotypical re

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