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Civics/Government

The goal of social studies education is to develop responsible, informed, and engaged citizens to foster civic, global, historical, geographic, and economic literacy. The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards, released by the National Council for the Social Studies in 2013 was purposefully designed to meet this goal by providing guidance to states and local school districts to enhance the rigor of K-12 civics, economics, geography, and history.

Subject Area: 

Piquing Student Curiosity with Title Pages from Works by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau (Sources and Strategies)

--Lee Ann Potter
The title pages of three books from the Enlightenment provide excellent points of entry for student research into the origins of ideas in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/sites/default/files/publications/se/7704/77...

K-12 assessments from WA

Organization: 
Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction

Washington state developed assessments for social studies K-12. These resources give a general rubric and structure to be used to assess social studies skills and content. Teachers choose their own specific topics and formats, and the rubric provides uniformity in scoring structure.

Scroll down to the table and look at the models that are provided for each subject area and grade level.

Organization website: 
www.k12.wa.us
Contact: 
Carol Coe
Contact email: 
Carol.coe@k12.wa.us
Assessment Resource Type: 

How can I teach civic responsibility to my 5th graders?

Margit McGuire

One of my favorite approaches for teaching civic responsibility is through an approach called Storypath. Teachers routinely teach about the founding of the nation in fifth grade so with this approach, students imagine themselves as colonists and the civic actions they took to create a new nation. The Storypath approach uses the story form--setting, characters, and plot—to structure the learning experience. Key questions throughout the unit problematize the events, encourage substantive conversations and guide students' thinking about important understandings.

Subject Area: 
The president´s annual speech to Congress on the condition of the nation offers students an opportunity to examine key domestic issues as well as the president´s proposals. (From Social Education
Subject Area: 

Draft of the Constitution (August 1787) and Schedule of the Compensation of the Senate of the United States (March 1791) / TWD

--Michael Hussey and Stephanie Greenhut
The two featured documents can serve as a starting point for a lesson on public service while students debate the amount of pay that public servants should receive.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/sites/default/files/publications//se/7501/7...

Historical Period: 

Cloture Motion to Cease Debate on 1964 Civil Rights Bill (Teaching with Documents)

--Lee Ann Potter
Students will gain a deeper understanding of legislative tactics like the filibuster when they study the featured document—the Senate motion that broke a 55-day filibuster against the Civil Rights Act.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/sites/default/files/publications//se/7406/7...

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