Skip to content Skip to navigation

General US History

A Picture’s Worth: Analyzing Historical Photographs in the Elementary Grades (Elementary Education)

--Keith C. Barton
Elementary teachers can use historical photographs in the classroom to engage young students in authentic historical inquiry. Students’ critical skills develop beyond mere observation as they consider what life was like when the photographs were taken.

Historical Period: 
Subject Area: 

[em]Marbury v. Madison[/em]: Bicentennial of a Landmark Decision (Looking at the Law)

--James H. Landman
This article revisits the historic two-hundred-year-old verdict that affirmed the Supreme Court’s right to review, and overturn, congressional or executive acts it deems unconstitutional.

Subject Area: 

OurDocuments.gov (Teaching with Documents)

—Lee Ann Potter
A newly launched project highlights one hundred landmark documents—such as the United States Constitution, Thomas Edison’s electric lamp patent, and the canceled check for Alaska—that have influenced the course of U.S. history. Here’s how to integrate these documents into classroom instruction.

Subject Area: 

Buttons to Bumper Stickers: Political Campaign Memorabilia (Teaching with Documents)

--Lee Ann Potter
From George Washington to George W. Bush, politicians have used campaign memorabilia to capture the attention of voters. By studying these items, students can learn a great deal about historical issues and candidates.

Historical Period: 
Subject Area: 

Teaching about the Electoral College

--David Dulio and the staff of the National Student/Parent Mock Election
When citizens step into the voting booth on election day, they are not actually voting for their candidate, but rather choosing a group of electors. This set of classroom activities explains one distinctively American institution--the Electoral College.

Historical Period: 
Subject Area: 

Documents and Civic Duties (Teaching with Documents)

—Lee Ann Potter
A one-sentence letter from school boy Anthony Ferreira to President Ford stating, “I think you are half right and half wrong ” is one of several primary sources featured in this article that highlight for students the value of responsible citizenship.

Subject Area: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - General US History