US History

American Indians: Hands-On Lessons


--Ann Lyle Rethlefsen
Fourth and fifth grade students learn about the Lakota tradition of creating a buffalo hide "graphic history" to mark important events.

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Teaching About American Indians


--Pamela McFaden Lobb
Consider four categories when selecting materials about American Indians: Native Authors (use whenever possible); art and illustration (avoid stereotypes); language (ex. avoid "squaw"); and perspective (avoid glorifying one historical point of view).

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“I” is for Indian? Dealing with Stereotypes in the Classroom


--Mark Finchum
A primer for recognizing stereotyping where it might occur in alphabet books; textbooks; children's literature; activities around the Thanksgiving and Columbus holidays; and portrayals of modern life in the USA.

http://publications.socialstudies.org/yl/1804/180404.pdf

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Displaced Children in U.S. History: Stories of Courage and Survival


--Brenda Betts
A brief survey of four major U.S. migrations of homeless children: the Cherokee Trail of Tears; the Underground Railroad; the Orphan Train Riders; and the One Thousand Children program (during the Holocaust). Includes brief accounts from four children.

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Breathing Life into History: Using Role-Playing to Engage Students


--Barbara C. Cruz and Shalini A. Murthy
With a bit of planning, teachers can utilize children's natural affinity for drama while teaching about historical events and people.

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Voyages of Discovery: Experiencing the Emotion of History


--Daniel A. Kelin, II
In their roles as Henry Hudson's sailors (ca. 1610 C.E.), third grade students "faced the cold, loneliness, frustration, and disorientation of Hudson's last voyage."

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Voyages of Discovery: Experiencing the Emotion of History


--Daniel A. Kelin, II
In their roles as Henry Hudson's sailors (ca. 1610 C.E.), third grade students "faced the cold, loneliness, frustration, and disorientation of Hudson's last voyage."

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Linking Literature and Primary Documents


--Pamela A. Nelson
Children's literature, primary source material, and active learning help students engage with history and prepare for citizenship.

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The Great Depression: Character, Citizenship, and History


--Gail McEachron
Children's literature helps elementary students "understand the human side of struggling during difficult economic times."

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Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips


--Nadine M. Roush
Some online activities are the next best thing to actually visiting Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia.

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