NCSS Online Teachers' Library

Gideon v. Wainwright at Fifty: Lessons for Democracy and Civics (Looking at the Law)


--Kevin Scruggs
The case of Gideon v. Wainwright can serve as a point of entry into a classroom discussion of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7702/770213109...

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Trend Alert: A History Teacher's Guide to Using Podcasts in the Classroom


--Kathleen Owings Swan and Mark Hofer
Podcasts may be useful in the classroom, but teachers need to consider the instructional purpose and context within which they are used.

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May Madness! A Classroom Competition Merges Historical Research with Public Debate


—Isaac Cosby Hunt III
In this end-of-the-year project, AP U.S. history students wage a competitive battle to determine the most significant American of the twentieth century.

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Exploring 350 Years of Jewish American History on the Internet


Michael J. Berson and Bárbara C. Cruz
For teachers who want to explore the rich history of Jewish involvement in the country’s social fabric, development, and politics, this article provides significant online and print resources.

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Documents and Civic Duties (Teaching with Documents)


—Lee Ann Potter
A one-sentence letter from school boy Anthony Ferreira to President Ford stating, “I think you are half right and half wrong ” is one of several primary sources featured in this article that highlight for students the value of responsible citizenship.

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Piecing It Together: America’s Story in Quilts


Judith R. Marrou
Like the United States, a quilt could be described by the words "e pluribus unum" -- out of the many, one.

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Teaching about the Electoral College


--David Dulio and the staff of the National Student/Parent Mock Election
When citizens step into the voting booth on election day, they are not actually voting for their candidate, but rather choosing a group of electors. This set of classroom activities explains one distinctively American institution--the Electoral College.

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Buttons to Bumper Stickers: Political Campaign Memorabilia (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
From George Washington to George W. Bush, politicians have used campaign memorabilia to capture the attention of voters. By studying these items, students can learn a great deal about historical issues and candidates.

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Supreme Court Roundup (Looking at the Law)


--Charles F. Williams
In its most recent term, the Supreme Court considered a range of important cases relating to the “War on Terror,” federalism, and sentencing guidelines. The author reviews some of the Court’s most significant rulings.

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OurDocuments.gov (Teaching with Documents)


—Lee Ann Potter
A newly launched project highlights one hundred landmark documents—such as the United States Constitution, Thomas Edison’s electric lamp patent, and the canceled check for Alaska—that have influenced the course of U.S. history. Here’s how to integrate these documents into classroom instruction.

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