NCSS Online Teachers' Library

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Turn Out Those Lights! The Merchant Marine and U-Boat Lane, 1942


--Caroline C. Sheffield and Andrew J. Nichols
As an editorial cartoonist, Dr. Seuss alerted his readers to German submarine attacks along the east coast of the United States in May 1942. Student handouts provide 3 cartoons, charts that tally lost ships, and lyrics to a folk song about the Merchant Marine.

This PDF downloads a 16-page issue of MLL, about 3 megabytes.

Related:

The Greensboro Sit-In: When Students Took Charge


--Eric Groce, Tina Heafner, and Katie O’Connor

Three college students, who read about and discussed recent civil rights protests, decided to try a sit-in at a local lunch counter on February 1, 1960. The idea caught on with young people. Why did this nonviolent method work at this time and in this place? Five teaching activities are outlined; on-site photos included.

The link below downloads one issue of Middle Level Learning, about 3 megabytes.

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Memorandum about the First Nixon-Kennedy Debate (Teaching with Documents)


--David L. Rosenbaum
A memo from John Kennedy’s press secretary to Richard Nixon’s press secretary prior to the first televised presidential debate in history serves as a jumping off point for studying the major issues of the 1960 election.

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Supreme Court Review (Looking at the Law)


--Charles F. Williams and Catherine Hawke
Recent Supreme Court decisions generated surprising controversy, from gun control to First Amendment issues. In 2011, the Court will weigh in on cases dealing with the hiring of illegal immigrants, protests at soldiers’ funerals, and selling violent video games.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7405/7405243.pdf

Related:

Supreme Court Review (Looking at the Law)


--Charles F. Williams and Catherine Hawke
Recent Supreme Court decisions generated surprising controversy, from gun control to First Amendment issues. In 2011, the Court will weigh in on cases dealing with the hiring of illegal immigrants, protests at soldiers’ funerals, and selling violent video games.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7405/7405243.pdf

Related:

The Bystander’s Dilemma: How Can We Turn our Students into Upstanders?


--Lauren Woglom and Kim Pennington
By studying moments in history where bystanders made a difference, teachers can motivate students to think critically in the face of social dilemmas.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7405/7405254.pdf

Related:

The Bystander’s Dilemma: How Can We Turn our Students into Upstanders?


--Lauren Woglom and Kim Pennington
By studying moments in history where bystanders made a difference, teachers can motivate students to think critically in the face of social dilemmas.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7405/7405254.pdf

Related:

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