NCSS Online Teachers' Library

Ford: Not a Lincoln but a Hayes? A Lesson in History and Political Science


By John A. Donnangelo
What makes a president successful? This article evaluates the presidency of Gerald Ford in the light of four theories by political scientists on presidential performance, highlighting one of them.

Related:

Listen Up: Studying the American Labor Movement Through Oral Histories


Cheryl Mason Bolick, Lisa Norberg, and Dayna Durbin
A growing collection of digitized oral history interviews on topics such as labor, civil rights, and women’s issues, allows students to hear firsthand about the experiences of individuals during critical periods in American history.

Related:

Chew Heong v. United States: Chinese Exclusion and the Federal Courts (Looking at the Law)


_ By Edited by James H. Landman_
A close look at the case of Chew Heong, a Chinese immigrant who challenged the nineteenth-century Chinese exclusion laws, provides important insight into early U.S. efforts to control immigration.

Related:

1906 Letter to the San Francisco Health Department (Teaching with Documents)


—Kristin Schmachtenberg
The 1906 earthquake that shattered San Franciscon exposed the city and nation's lack of disaster preparedness. The featured document highlights the dismal state of rations provided to those left homeless.

Related:

Documents and Civic Duties (Teaching with Documents)


—Lee Ann Potter
A one-sentence letter from school boy Anthony Ferreira to President Ford stating, “I think you are half right and half wrong ” is one of several primary sources featured in this article that highlight for students the value of responsible citizenship.

Related:

Affidavit in the Case of [em]Orville and Wilbur Wright vs. Glenn H. Curtiss[/em]


--Kahlil G. Chism and Lee Ann Potter
Orville and Wilbur Wright were not the only inventors working on airplane innovations. But the Wright brothers’ patent gave them a tremendous advantage and inhibited manufacturers from producing planes for a time just before World War I.

Related:

Affidavit in the Case of [em]Orville and Wilbur Wright vs. Glenn H. Curtiss[/em] (Teaching with Documents)


--Kahlil G. Chism and Lee Ann Potter
Orville and Wilbur Wright were not the only inventors working on airplane innovations. But the Wright brothers’ patent gave them a tremendous advantage and inhibited manufacturers from producing planes for a time just before World War I.

Related:

A Bill to Relieve Certain Legal Disabilities of Women (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
After a long struggle, Belva A. Lockwood became the first woman admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court.

Related:

OurDocuments.gov (Teaching with Documents)


—Lee Ann Potter
A newly launched project highlights one hundred landmark documents—such as the United States Constitution, Thomas Edison’s electric lamp patent, and the canceled check for Alaska—that have influenced the course of U.S. history. Here’s how to integrate these documents into classroom instruction.

Related:

Frederic Remington’s Image of the Frontier


--Robert L. Stevens
Even as the Western frontier was disappearing in the 1880s, Eastern illustrator Frederic Remington was conjuring up an image of it that found wide popularity among the urban public. More myth than reality, Remington’s works helped to obscure the real nature of the struggle between white settlers and American Indians over land in the West.

Related:
Stay Connected with NCSS:   Follow NCSSNetwork on Twitter FaceBook.png rss_0.gif