NCSS Online Teachers' Library

The Rosenberg Trial—Uncovering the Layers of History (Looking at the Law)


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--Bruce A. Ragsdale
Newly available online documents about the trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg offer students a unique opportunity to investigate, analyze, and craft their own narratives about this high profile Cold War espionage case.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7704/7704180.pdf

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From Freedom Riders to the Children’s March: Civil Rights Documentaries as Catalysts for Historical Empathy


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--Lisa Brown Buchanan
These four documentary films can engage students in historical thinking, expand their capacity for empathy, and hone discussion and writing skills.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7802/78020491.pdf

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Gideon v. Wainwright at Fifty: Lessons for Democracy and Civics (Looking at the Law)


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--Kevin Scruggs
The case of Gideon v. Wainwright can serve as a point of entry into a classroom discussion of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7702/770213109...

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The Crash of 2008: Causes and Fed Response


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By James D. Gwartney and Joseph Connors
The current economic crisis is primarily a story about unintended consequences and what happens when the incentive structure is damaged by unsound institutions and policies.

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The Keys to the White House: Prediction for 2008


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By Allan Lichtman
Students will comprehend the many factors that influence an election when they analyze why this successful prediction system forecasts a popular vote victory for the Democrats in 2008.

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The Updated Verdict of the Keys


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By Allan J. Lichtman
Read this article to see what a historically accurate prediction system forecasts as the outcome of the popular vote this presidential election.

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Ford: Not a Lincoln but a Hayes? A Lesson in History and Political Science


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By John A. Donnangelo
What makes a president successful? This article evaluates the presidency of Gerald Ford in the light of four theories by political scientists on presidential performance, highlighting one of them.

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9/11 and Terrorism: “The Ultimate Teachable Moment” in Textbooks and Supplemental Curricula


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Diana Hess and Jeremy Stoddard
A survey of curricular materials developed to address 9/11, reveals there is great discrepancy on how the topic should be covered and what students should be learning.

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Executive Power in an Age of Terror (Looking at the Law)


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—James H. Landman
In today’s era of terrorism, marked by a non-traditional enemy, should the executive branch have greater authority? This article looks at the extent of the president’s power and the role of Congress and the judiciary in checking and balancing that power.

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From the Classroom to the Battlefield: A National Guardsman Talks about His Experience in Iraq


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—Toni Fuss Kirkwood-Tucker
Many struggling youth see military service and the benefits it provides as a way to pursue dreams like a college education. One young man who joined the National Guard spoke with his former teacher about fighting in Iraq and how it changed him.

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