NCSS Online Teachers' Library

Across the Color Line: Diversity, Public Education, and the Supreme Court (Looking at the Law)


By Michelle Parrini
This review of key Supreme Court cases dealing with school integration can foster class discussion on racial progress and the role of the courts in determining educational policy.

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Question: Who Can Vote?


By Misty D. Rodeheaver and Mary E. Haas
Key historical events changed voting practices in America and extended the right to vote. This article spotlights a few of those events, as well as contemporary voting issues, and outlines a teacher-tested lesson on voting.

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Ford: Not a Lincoln but a Hayes? A Lesson in History and Political Science


By John A. Donnangelo
What makes a president successful? This article evaluates the presidency of Gerald Ford in the light of four theories by political scientists on presidential performance, highlighting one of them.

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The Presidential Timeline of the 20th Century (Teaching with Documents)


Paul Resta, Betty S. Flowers, and Ken Tothero
This interactive website with digitized resources from 12 presidential libraries offers students a close-up look at key moments of a president’s term.

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October 1957 Memorandum Related to Sputnik (Teaching with Documents)


By Missy McNatt and David Traill
This month marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Soviet launch of Sputnik, which fueled American panic that the Soviet Union could fire intercontinental ballistic missiles. The featured document highlights President Eisenhower’s reaction and the government’s response.

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The Great Communicator Files


By Mira Cohen
Students will learn a great deal about the process of presidential speechwriting when they study primary documents related to well-known speeches such as President Reagan’s “Omaha Beach Memorial Remarks.”

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Researching the Viet Nam War Inside Viet Nam: U.S. Student Teachers Explore War Myths


By Robert E. Vadas
Aiming to correct myths about the Viet Nam War, this author regularly leads groups of students to learn about the country firsthand.

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Using Art to Teach History to Young Learners (Elementary Education)


—Lois McFadyen Christensen
This lesson plan offers elementary students the opportunity to learn about the civil rights movement through the memory-inspired paintings of folk artist and voting rights activist Bernice Sims.

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Letter in Support of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
Progress and development has sometimes led to the destruction of landmarks. The featured document highlights the struggle to preserve historic sites and leads students to consider the value of their own community’s landmarks.

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The Shadow War (Looking at the Law)


--Michelle Parrini and Charles F. Williams
A renewed U.S. government emphasis on espionage to guard against future terrorist attacks brings with it a host of legal challenges concerning the identification and exposure of covert agents and their legal rights.

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