NCSS Online Teachers' Library

An Annotated List of Census Resources for Educators


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--Pat Watson
Census in Schools, www.census.gov/schools, is the official site of the Census Bureau’s K-12 program. The "History Timeline" is a great resource. Click on the "History and Pop Culture" icon to find it, as described in the accompanying article "Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools," by Janice Jefferson. Then see images and facts about Americans as they lived and worked over two centuries. Both brief articles are linked here:

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An Annotated List of Census Resources for Educators


PDF versionPDF version

--Pat Watson
Census in Schools, www.census.gov/schools, is the official site of the Census Bureau’s K-12 program. The "History Timeline" is a great resource. Click on the "History and Pop Culture" icon to find it, as described in the accompanying article "Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools," by Janice Jefferson. Then see images and facts about Americans as they lived and worked over two centuries. Both brief articles are linked here:

Related:

History Mystery Lessons: Powhatan Culture / Lewis & CLark


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--Jana Kirchner and Carla Judd

The Pullout of the Jan/Feb 2011 issue of SSYL comprised two History Mystery Lessons: The first was about Powhatan culture, and included a clue sheet about life in a Native American village.

The second (by Allison Helm, Kristin Pierce, and Michele Galloway) suggested placing 12 clues (each accompanied by a reading from Lewis's journal, 1803-1806) throughout the room, then inviting students to examine, record, and hypothesize about what they observe and read.

The learning environment in this method is described in detail in the article "History + Mystery = Inquiring Young Historians" by Jana Kirchner, Allison Helm, Kristin Pierce, and Michelle Galloway.

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Piquing Student Curiosity with Title Pages from Works by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau (Sources and Strategies)


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--Lee Ann Potter
The title pages of three books from the Enlightenment provide excellent points of entry for student research into the origins of ideas in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7704/7704168.pdf

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Encouraging Student Interest in the Economic Context of the Constitution with Continental Currency (Sources and Strategies)


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--Lee Ann Potter
A close look at the featured currency issued by the Continental Congress can launch a lesson on the economic problems that preceded the drafting of the Constitution.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7804/7804157.pdf

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What Constitution Day Means and Why it Matters (Looking at the Law)


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--Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Constitution Day offers an opportune time for students to explore the evolution of the founding document and examine its provisions for citizens’ rights and rules of government.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7804/7804160.pdf

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Mapping Early American History: Beyond What Happened Where


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--Andrew J. Milson
The three highlighted early American historical maps will provide students with important insight into the geographical understanding of people in the past and the implications of this limited knowledge.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7805/780514216...

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Exploring the Legacy of Magna Carta with Students through Historic Images (Sources and Strategies)


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--Stephen Wesson
The two featured portraits of Revolutionary-era writer John Dickinson next to a book titled “Magna Charta,” can launch an enlightening lesson on the thirteenth-century charter´s influence on America´s founding documents.
* http://socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7806/7806261.pdf

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Magna Carta at 800: Ten Key Questions Answered (Lessons on the Law)


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--Howard Kaplan
As the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta approaches, Lessons on the Law provides an overview of the “Great Charter” and identifies teaching materials to engage students.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7806/7806265.pdf

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Free Press in a Constitutional Democracy


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--Christine Lucianek
Students will acquire a deeper understanding of freedom of the press when they consider the context for its inclusion in the First Amendment and examine its implications in the Internet age.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7806/7806298.pdf

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