NCSS Online Teachers' Library

Historic Sites and Your Students


--William E. White
Field trips to historic sites, such as to the house in Colonial Williamsburg of Revolution-era scholar George Wythe, offer students a tangible and physical connection to the past.

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Historic Sites and Your Students


--William E. White
Field trips to historic sites, such as to the house in Colonial Williamsburg of Revolution-era scholar George Wythe, offer students a tangible and physical connection to the past.

Related:

Historic Sites and Your Students


--William E. White
Field trips to historic sites, such as to the house in Colonial Williamsburg of Revolution-era scholar George Wythe, offer students a tangible and physical connection to the past.

Related:

A Living History Classroom: Using Re-Enactment to Enhance Learning


--Mark L. Daniels
Teachers and students can bring history to life by donning period clothing or carrying objects common in past eras to engage students and enhance classroom presentations.

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Primary Source of the Day: A Warm Up Activity


--Amy Trenkle

"Almost every class period, I begin with a primary source." The teacher uses a short quote; a photocopy of a photograph, newspaper illustration or cartoon; or an actual object to spark interest. Such a primary source can serve as a review of yesterday's lesson, a transition to today's lesson, or an overture to a whole new topic. Examples are given of sources and how they are used.

The following URL will download the entire issue of MLL, which is about 2.52 MB.

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Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

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