NCSS Online Teachers' Library

NCSS has selected a collection of classroom activities, teaching ideas, and articles from Social Education, Middle Level Learning, and Social Studies and the Young Learner. Browse the collection, or search by historical period and grade level using the search function below.
(Collections on other disciplines are under development.)

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The Great Irish Famine (and Immigration to USA)


--Maureen Murphy, Alan Singer, Maureen McCann Miletta, and Judity Y. Singer
Theme issue with brief history, excerpts from primary historical documents, references, handouts, historical fiction/diary.

This URL downloads all 16 pages of Middle Level Learning as a black-and-white pdf of about 3.0 MB:
* http://members.ncss.org/mll/09/MLLSept2000BW.pdf

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A Crossword Puzzle for Higher-Order Thinking


--James Monack
Challenge your students with this crossword puzzle about the Revolutionary Era, or fashion your own about any era of history, with the use of a website's puzzle generator. This 32-page issue of MLL also includes a review of a book about community activist Jane Jacobs, who fought against "urban renewal" schemes in the 1960s, as well as and article (featured cover image) about a curious incident with tulips during the Dutch Golden Age (1600s).

This URL downloads all 16 pages of Middle Level Learning as a pdf of about 2 MB:

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Students Preserve an Emancipation Site with Archaeological Technology


--Paul LaRue
High school students in Ohio combine study with experience as they unearth and clean artifacts in order to re-create the history of an early settlement of emancipated slaves.

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It is My Desire to be Free: Annie Davis’s Letter to Abraham Lincoln and Winslow Homer’s Painting ... (Teaching with Documents)


--Michael Hussey and Elizabeth K. Eder
A study of the featured document and painting will give students a greater understanding of the multi-step process of emancipation and the changing relationship that developed between freed slaves and former slave owners.

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Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Interdisciplinary Activities Using Census in Schools


--Janice Jefferson

A U.S. history timeline is available at www.census.gov if you click on the “History & Pop Culture” icon. Colorful, illustrated webpages appear with all sorts of facts and figures about a time period, from 1790 to the present. Interestingly, this wonderful resource--of interest to all students in grade levels K-college--is not easily found with a Google search on the key words “census” and “timeline.”
Other U.S. Census resources are described in this and other articles to be found in the March/April 2010 issue of SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE YOUNG LEARNER, available in the NCSS Journal Archives.

Related:

Advocating for Abolition: Staging an Abolitionist Society Convention


--Andy Robinson and Joan Brodsky Schur
This simulation illustrates for students that the most complex debates in American history are not necessarily between those for and against social change, but among those who agree on the goal, but disagree on the means.
*http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7404/

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Learning History with Mini-Camcorders


--Jeremy D. Stoddard and Meg Hoffman
Three activities described here engage the creativity of at-risk students by incorporating mini-camcorders into the study of the American Revolution, Civil War, and Post-Reconstruction.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7502/7522011107.pdf

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