NCSS has selected a collection of classroom activities, teaching ideas, and articles from Social Education, Middle Level Learning, and Social Studies and the Young Learner. Browse the collection, or search by historical period and grade level using the search function below.
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The “Starving Time” Wikinquiry: Using a Wiki to Foster Historical Inquiry


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By Jeremy D. Stoddard, Mark J. Hofer, and Molly G. Buchanan
Highlighting a wikinquiry on the Jamestown colony’s ‘starving time,’ the authors demonstrate a wiki’s power to promote student collaboration, enhance communication, and improve construction of knowledge.

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Puritan Day: A Social Science Simulation


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By Joan Brodsky Schur
Eighth-grade students gain a greater understanding of social control and tyranny when they participate in a Puritan Day simulation.

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Harvest Ceremony—Beyond the Thanksgiving Myth


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--Johanna Gorelick and Genevieve Simermeyer/The Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian
While the modern story of Thanksgiving describes the original feast as a friendly gathering of neighbors, in reality it had much more to do with political alliances, diplomacy, and an attempt at peaceful coexistence.

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Lesson Plan: New England and the African Slave Trade


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—Choices for the 21st Century Education Program, Brown University
Although many people in the United States think of slavery as a Southern institution, New England has a more complex history of slavery and slave trading than many realize.

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Ribbons and Beads: Native American Art Reveals History and Culture


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Ava L. McCall
The textile arts are a valuable means by which students learn about the history of specific Native American nations.

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Colonial Williamsburg Electronic Field Trips


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--Nadine M. Roush
Some online activities are the next best thing to actually visiting Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia.

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Voyages of Discovery: Experiencing the Emotion of History


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--Daniel A. Kelin, II
In their roles as Henry Hudson's sailors (ca. 1610 C.E.), third grade students "faced the cold, loneliness, frustration, and disorientation of Hudson's last voyage."

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Voyages of Discovery: Experiencing the Emotion of History


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--Daniel A. Kelin, II
In their roles as Henry Hudson's sailors (ca. 1610 C.E.), third grade students "faced the cold, loneliness, frustration, and disorientation of Hudson's last voyage."

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“I” is for Indian? Dealing with Stereotypes in the Classroom


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--Mark Finchum
A primer for recognizing stereotyping where it might occur in alphabet books; textbooks; children's literature; activities around the Thanksgiving and Columbus holidays; and portrayals of modern life in the USA.

http://publications.socialstudies.org/yl/1804/180404.pdf

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Teaching About American Indians


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--Pamela McFaden Lobb
Consider four categories when selecting materials about American Indians: Native Authors (use whenever possible); art and illustration (avoid stereotypes); language (ex. avoid "squaw"); and perspective (avoid glorifying one historical point of view).

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