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Middle Level

A Pocketful of History

--Sherry L. Field and Linda D. Labbo
Read a biography. Then examine "pocket contents." In Lincoln's vest pocket? A draft for a speech, theater tickets, and a photograph of his family, among other items. "Artifacts" are suggested for the pockets of Benito Juarez (president of Mexico), Grandma Moses (artist), Mary McLeod Bethune (black educator), and others.

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Civil Rights Lesson Plan (kidsinbirmingham1963.org)

Looking for a lesson plan that will launch young people into imagining themselves as agents of change? "Kids in Birmingham 1963" shares its second ready-to-go lesson, "What would YOU do?: The 1963 Birmingham Children's Crusade." Students read brief interview statemets from four people, black and white, who were youth in Birmingham at the time of the march. Today's students reflect on whether they would have joined -- or not.
Visit http://kidsinbirmingham1963.org/class-room.

2011 Notable Social Studies Trade Books For Young People

2012 Notable Social Studies Trade Books For Young People

2013 Notable Social Studies Trade Books For Young People

2014 Notable Social Studies Trade Books For Young People

Maps vs Mapping: Visualizing History and Geography

Interactive mapping techniques invite students to connect with content to visualize information beyond mere location. Mapping challenges learners to think, develop literacy skills, and understand the complexity global issues.

TalkNCSS: DC Social Studies Teachers Leading Teachers

One of the biggest issues educators point to with the way states and the federal governments make policy decisions is the lack of teacher input in crafting those decisions. Furthermore, most teachers believe that there is a clear disconnect between the “powers that be” and their classrooms. For a group of D.C. public school teachers, leading their colleagues has become a priority not because they want to clarify policy, but because they know it will lead to better instruction and to a better education for their students. In doing so, they're proving that teacher leaders don't wait for a set of directives to act, but instead act because they know their work is right course of action.

From the Past to the Present: Taking Informed Action

Dimension 4 of the C3 framework requires that students take informed action. Learn how to take students from inquiry to active citizenship by helping them connect historical events to current events, and then take informed action.

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