Results of the

Census of 2000

 

The U.S. Census Bureau has released some of the major results of the census of 2000, and a steady stream of more detailed statistics will come from the Bureau this spring and summer. Teachers and other members of the public can check the Census Bureau website, www.census.gov, for information about new findings as they become available.1

The big overall news was a larger than expected increase in the total resident U.S. population, which was shown by the count of April 2000 to have reached 281,421,906—an increase of almost 33 million, or about 13.1 percent, from the last census of 1990. Earlier estimates made by the Census Bureau before the April 2000 count had projected the population at about 274,500,000—almost 7 million fewer than the census actually showed.

The two tables on the pages that follow provide basic information about the overall population of the United States. The first table is a state-by-state comparison of the U.S. resident population in 2000 with that of 1990. The second table presents the “apportionment population,” which is used as the basis for determining the number of representatives states will have in the House of Representatives that will be elected in November 2002. The “apportionment population” includes both the resident population of a state and persons from the state living overseas. The table shows the changes in the number of apportioned representatives that will result from the census of 2000.

 

The Population by Race

In the census of 2000, the Census Bureau revised its earlier questions about race to provide a more precise picture of the country’s diversity. Respondents were given the option of selecting one or more race categories to define their racial identities.2 A Census 2000 Brief written by Elizabeth M. Grieco and Rachel C. Cassidy provides the following preview of the overall results:3

 

> Approximately 211.5 million people, or 75.1 percent of the total population, reported that their race was “only White.” A further 5.5 million reported a combination of White and at least one other race.

 

> About 34.7 million people, or 12.3 percent of the population, identified themselves as having a racial background that was only Black or African American. A further 1.8 million people reported a combination of Black or African American and at least one other race.

 

> About 2.5 million people, or 0.9 percent of the total population, reported a racial background that was only American Indian or Alaska Native. A further 1.6 million people reported a combination of American Indian or Alaska Native and at least one other race.

 

> About 10.2 million people, or 3.6 percent of the total population, identified themselves as having a racial background that was only Asian. An additional 1.7 million reported a combination of Asian and at least one other race.

 

> About 399,000 people or 0.1 percent of the total population, identified themselves as having a racial background that was only that of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.
A further 476,000 people reported a combination of this racial background and at least one other race.

 

> Approximately 15.4 million people, or 5.5 percent, identified themselves as belonging to “some other race” than those described above, while about 6.8 million, or 2.4 percent, described themselves as belonging to “two or more races.”

 

Hispanic Heritage

> Persons of Hispanic origin numbered about 35.3 million, or 12.5 percent of the total population. Being of Hispanic origin is not classified by the census as belonging to a “race,” so persons of Hispanic origin were asked to identify their racial background. Among all persons of Hispanic origin, about 47.9 percent identified themselves as being only White; 2.0 percent as being only Black or African American; 1.2 percent as only American Indian or Alaska Native; 0.3 percent as only Asian; and 0.1 percent as only Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander. A further 42.2 percent described themselves as belonging to “some other race” than those mentioned in the census question, while 6.3 percent described themselves as belonging to two or more races.

 

Notes

1. A special section of the website for teachers can be found at www.census.gov/dmd/www/schindex.htm

2. Because of the revisions, the data on race in the 2000 census are not directly comparable with data on race in earlier censuses, and teachers will need to use caution in evaluating changes in the racial composition of the population over time. Because more than one option was offered in the 2000 census for describing racial background, there is a risk of double counting or inconsistent treatment when comparing population groups of different racial background with each other or with ethnic groups.

3. See Elizabeth M. Grieco and Rachel C. Cassidy, “Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin.” The full text of this Census 2000 Brief is available at www.census.gov/population/www/cen2000/briefs.html

Table 1
Resident Population of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico
April 1, 2000 (Census 2000) and April 1, 1990 (1990 Census)

Area April 1, 2000 April 1, 1990
Numeric Change Percent Change State Rank as of April 1, 2000 State Rank as of April 1, 1990
Alabama 4,447,100 4,040,587 406,513 10.1 23 22
Alaska 626,932 550,043 76,889 14.0 48 49

Arizona

5,130,632 3,665,228 1,465,404 40.0 20 24
Arkansas 2,673,400 2,350,725 322,675 13.7 33 33
California 33,871,648 29,760,021 4,111,627 13.8 1 1
Colorado 4,301,261 3,294,394 1,006,867 30.6 24 26
Connecticut 3,405,565 3,287,116 118,449 3.6 29 27
Delaware 783,600 666,168 117,432 17.6 45 46
District of Columbia 572,059 606,900 -34,841 -5.7 (NA) (NA)
Florida 15,982,378 12,937,926 3,044,452 23.5 4 4
Georgia 8,186,453 6,478,216 1,708,237 26.4 10 11
Hawaii 1,211,537 1,108,229 103,308 9.3 42 41
Idaho 1,293,953 1,006,749 287,204 28.5 39 42
Illinois 12,419,293 11,430,602 988,691 8.6 5 6
Indiana 6,080,485 5,544,159 536,326 9.7 14 14
Iowa 2,926,324 2,776,755 149,569 5.4 30 30
Kansas
2,688,418 2,477,574 210,844 8.5 32 32
Kentucky 4,041,769 3,685,296 356,473 9.7 25 23
Louisiana 4,468,976 4,219,973 249,003 5.9 22 21
Maine 1,274,923 1,227,928 46,995 3.8 40 38
Maryland 5,296,486 4,781,468 515,018 10.8 19 19
Massachusetts 6,349,097 6,016,425 332,672 5.5 13 13
Michigan 9,938,444 9,295,297 643,147 6.9 8 8
Minnesota 4,919,479 4,375,099 544,380 12.4 21 20
Mississippi 2,844,658 2,573,216 271,442 10.5 31 31
Missouri 5,595,211 5,117,073 478,138 9.3 17 15
Montana 902,195 799,065 103,130 12.9 44 44
Nebraska 1,711,263 1,578,385 132,878 8.4 38 36
Nevada 1,998,257 1,201,833 796,424 66.3 35 39
New Hampshire
1,235,786 1,109,252 126,534 11.4 41 40
New Jersey
8,414,350 7,730,188 684,162 8.9 9 9
New Mexico 1,819,046 1,515,069 303,977 20.1 36 37
New York 18,976,457 17,990,455 986,002 5.5 3 2
North Carolina 8,049,313 6,628,637 1,420,676 21.4 11 10
North Dakota 642,200 638,800 3,400 0.5 47 47
Ohio 11,353,140 10,847,115 506,025 4.7 7 7
Oklahoma 3,450,654 3,145,585 305,069 9.7 27 28
Oregon 3,421,399 2,842,321 579,078 20.4 28 29
Pennsylvania 12,281,054 11,881,643 399,411 3.4 6 5
Rhode Island 1,048,319 1,003,464 44,855 4.5 43 43
South Carolina 4,012,012 3,486,703 525,309 15.1 26 25
South Dakota 754,844 696,004 58,840 8.5 46 45
Tennessee 5,689,283 4,877,185 812,098 16.7 16 17
Texas 20,851,820 16,986,510 3,865,310 22.8 2 3
Utah 2,233,169 1,722,850 510,319 29.6 34 35
Vermont 608,827 562,758 46,069 8.2 49 48
Virginia 7,078,515 6,187,358 891,157 14.4 12 12
Washington 5,894,121 4,866,692 1,027,429 21.1 15 18
West Virginia 1,808,344 1,793,477 14,867 0.8 37 34
Wisconsin 5,363,675 4,891,769 471,906 9.6 18 16
Wyoming 493,782 453,588 40,194 8.9 50 50
Total Resident Population 281,421,906 248,709,873 32,712,033 13.2 (NA) (NA)
Northeast 53,594,378 50,809,229 2,785,149 5.5 (NA) (NA)
Midwest 64,392,776 59,668,632 4,724,144 7.9 (NA) (NA)
South 100,236,820 85,445,930 14,790,890 17.3 (NA) (NA)
West 63,197,932 52,786,082 10,411,850 19.7 (NA) (NA)
Puerto Rico
3,808,610 3,522,037 286,573 8.1 (NA) (NA)
Total Resident Population,
including Puerto Rico
285,230,516 252,231,910 32,998,606 13.1 (NA) (NA)

Table 2. Apportionment Population and Number of Representatives, by State: Census 2000
State

State Apportionment
Population
Overseas Population (included in Apportionment Population)2 Number of Apportioned Representatives Based on Census 2000 Change From 1990 Census Apportionment
Alabama 4,461,130 14,030 7 0
Alaska 628,933 2,001 1 0

Arizona

5,140,683 10,051 8 +2
Arkansas 2,679,733 6,333 4 0
California 33,930,798 59,150 53 +1
Colorado 4,311,882 10,621 7 +1
Connecticut 3,409,535 3,970 5 -1
Delaware 785,068 1,468 1 0
Florida 16,028,890 46,512 25 +2
Georgia 8,206,975 20,522 13 +2
Hawaii 1,216,642 5,105 2 0
Idaho 1,297,274 3,321 2 0
Illinois 12,439,042 19,749 19 -1
Indiana 6,090,782 10,297 9 -1
Iowa 2,931,923 5,599 5 0
Kansas 2,693,824 5,406 4 0
Kentucky 4,049,431 7,662 6 0
Louisiana 4,480,271 11,295 7 0
Maine 1,277,731 2,808 2 0
Maryland 5,307,886 11,400 8 0
Massachusetts 6,355,568 6,471 10 0
Michigan 9,955,829 17,385 15 -1
Minnesota 4,925,670 6,191 8 0
Mississippi 2,852,927 8,269 4 -1
Missouri 5,606,260 11,049 9 0
Montana 905,316 3,121 1 0
Nebraska 1,715,369 4,106 3 0
Nevada 2,002,032 3,775 3 +1
New Hampshire
1,238,415 2,629 2 0
New Jersey
8,424,354 10,004 13 0
New Mexico 1,823,821 4,775 3 0
New York 19,004,973 28,516 29 -2
North Carolina 8,067,673 18,360 13 +1
North Dakota 643,756 1,556 1 0
Ohio 11,374,540 21,400 18 -1
Oklahoma 3,458,819 8,165 5 -1
Oregon 3,428,543 7,144 5 0
Pennsylvania 12,300,670 19,616 19 -2
Rhode Island 1,049,662 1,343 2 0
South Carolina 4,025,061 13,049 6 0
South Dakota 756,874 2,030 1 0
Tennessee 5,700,037 10,754 9 0
Texas 20,903,994 52,174 32 +2
Utah 2,236,714 3,545 3 0
Vermont 609,890 1,063 1 0
Virginia 7,100,702 22,187 11 0
Washington 5,908,684 14,563 9 0
West Virginia 1,813,077 4,733 3 0
Wisconsin 5,371,210 7,535 8 -1
Wyoming 495,304 1,522 1 0
Total1 281,424,177 576,367 435



1. Includes the resident population for the 50 states, as ascertained by the Twenty-Second Decennial Census under Title 13, United States Code, and counts of overseas U.S. military and federal civilian employees (and their dependents living with them) allocated to their home state, as reported by the employing federal agencies. The apportionment population excludes the population of the District of Columbia.
2. Includes overseas U.S. military and federal civilian employees (and their dependents living with them) allocated to their home state, as reported by the employing federal agencies.
NOTE: As required by the January 1999 U.S. Supreme Court ruling (Department of Commerce v. House of Representatives, 525 U.S. 316, 119 S. Ct. 765 (1999)), these resident population counts do not reflect the use of statistical sampling to correct for overcounting or undercounting.
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau.