Secondary/High School

Teaching about the Electoral College


--David Dulio and the staff of the National Student/Parent Mock Election
When citizens step into the voting booth on election day, they are not actually voting for their candidate, but rather choosing a group of electors. This set of classroom activities explains one distinctively American institution--the Electoral College.

Related:

Robert E. Lee's Demand for the Surrender of John Brown (Teaching with Documents)


--Daniel F. Rulli
John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry--considered treasonous by some and heroic by others--helped strengthen the anti-slavery movement. Students can gain a deeper understanding of this event by studying General Lee’s demand for Brown’s surrender.

Related:

1863 Letter from Ralph Waldo Emerson about Walt Whitman (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
During the Civil War, poet Walt Whitman was eager to work for the government. Though federal jobs weren’t easy to come by, a letter of recommendation from Ralph Waldo Emerson was able to push open government doors.

Related:

Harriet Jacobs: Using Online Slave Narratives in the Classroom


--Cheryl Mason Bolick and Meghan M. McGlinn
With digital libraries, valuable documents become readily available, such as the writings of a former slave, Harriet Jacobs, who became an outspoken opponent of slavery.

Related:

School Desegregation Depicted in Docudrama


--David L. Wolfford
The author provides in-depth reviews of six films on desegregation.

Related:

Separate Is Not Equal: [em]Brown v. Board of Education[/em] Resources—A Guide for Study and Discussion


--Alonzo N. Smith
This study guide provides a range of resources in preparation for the fiftieth anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education.

Related:

Letter from President Millard Fillmore to the Emperor of Japan (Teaching with Documents)


--Marvin Pinkert and Lee Ann Potter
A letter from President Fillmore plays a key role in overcoming Japan’s “closed country” policy.

Related:

Order of Argument in the Case [em]Brown v. Board of Education[/em] (Teaching with Documents)


--Kahlil Chism, contributing author, and Lee Ann Potter, editor
The Order of Argument in Brown v. Board of Education is a short document, but it can launch students on a long voyage of understanding of this milestone case.

Related:

An End and a Beginning: The Fiftieth Anniversary of [em]Brown v. Board of Education[/em] (Looking at the Law)


--James H. Landman
Fifty years ago this May, the Supreme Court decision on the case of Brown v. Board of Education changed the course of American history. Here is the background to the judgment that outlawed segregation policies in public schools.

Related:

Documents and Civic Duties (Teaching with Documents)


—Lee Ann Potter
A one-sentence letter from school boy Anthony Ferreira to President Ford stating, “I think you are half right and half wrong ” is one of several primary sources featured in this article that highlight for students the value of responsible citizenship.

Related:
Syndicate content
Stay Connected with NCSS:   Follow NCSSNetwork on Twitter FaceBook.png rss_0.gif