9-11 Commemoration Resources

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2011 marks the 10th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. NCSS has collected resources from its journals Social Education, Social Studies and the Young Learner, and Middle Level Learning that teachers can use when preparing to teach about 9-11 and acknowledge the upcoming anniversary. Also listed are several additional online resources.

From National Council for the Social Studies

Social Education, September 2011
The September 2011 issue of Social Education, the flagship journal of NCSS, includes several articles that teachers might find to be useful for their classrooms as we acknowledge the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the United States of September 11, 2001. (These articles are available for purchase at Scribd.com; they are free for NCSS members in the online Publications Archive. The articles listed below are free PDFs, courtesy of NCSS. Just click on the title.)

In War, Is Law Silent? Security and Freedom After September 11
From airport security to wiretapping to racial profiling, in times of crisis, how do we balance the desire for personal freedom with the need for national security? A free article by Ed O'Brien in Social Education, November/December 2001.

9/11 and Terrorism: “The Ultimate Teachable Moment” in Textbooks and Supplemental Curricula
A survey of curricular materials developed to address 9/11 reveals there is great discrepancy on how the topic should be covered and what students should be learning. A free article by Diana Hess and Jeremy Stoddard in Social Education, September 2007.

Executive Power in an Age of Terror (Looking at the Law)
In today’s era of terrorism, marked by a non-traditional enemy, should the executive branch have greater authority? The author looks at the extent of the president’s power and the role of Congress and the judiciary in checking and balancing that power. A free article by James H. Landman in Social Education, November/December 2001.

A Thoughtful Patriotism
Through poetry, art, and patriotic speeches, students can deliberate on the true meaning of patriotism and become thoughtful and effective citizens. A free article by Roger Wilkins in Social Education, October 2002.

Restoring the Rights of Afghan Women: An Interview with Nasrine Abou-Bakre Gross
An Afghan American woman and activist talks with Social Education about the role of education, the future of women's rights, and her hopes for Afghanistan. A free article in Social Education, January/February, 2002

We are Living History: Reflections of a New York City Social Studies Teacher
The attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, had a profound impact on the nation and the world. A social studies teacher chronicles the events as they happened in her own neighborhood in lower Manhattan. A free article by Joan Brodsky Schur in Social Education, October 2001.

The Trauma of Terrorism: Helping Children Cope
In the wake of tragedy, how can we help our students make sense of events, feel safe and protected, and even learn from the experience? A free article by Ilene R. and Michael J. Berson in Social Education, October 2001.

At Risk of Prejudice: Teaching Tolerance about Muslim Americans
Common misperceptions about the religion of Islam threaten to distort views of Muslim Americans and their convictions. The author answers questions about the Muslim faith, community, and beliefs. A free article by Karima Alavi in Social Education, October 2001.

At Risk of Prejudice: The Arab American Community
As Arab Americans face growing resentment from segments of the U.S. population, how can we protect our Arab American students from encountering such prejudice, educate all our students about the Arab American community, and emphasize tolerance over bigotry?
A free article by Zeina Azzam Seikaly in Social Education, October 2001.

Middle Level Learning, May/June 2002
The May/June 2002 issue of Middle Level Learning includes two articles related to 9-11. "My Name is Osama", a short story by Sharifa Alkhateeb and Steven S. Lapham, tells of an immigrant boy (the family has fled from Saddam Hussein's Iraq) who has a first name that is quite common in the Arabic world: Osama. In "World Religions and Personal Tolerance" by Sofia Udner, a seventh grade teacher is in the middle of a unit of study about world religions when the attacks of 9-11-2001 occur.

Both Sides of the Classroom Door: After 9-11, the Many Facets of Teaching
Teachers not only give instruction, but they themselves can grow as stewards, moderators, citizens, and learners. As caring and knowledgeable adults, we can feel our way through discussion that center on students' need to understand. A free article by Mary Lee Webeck, Mary S. Black, O. L. Davis, Jr., and Sherry Field in Social Studies and the Young Learner in January/February 2002.

In War, Is Law Silent? Security and Freedom After September 11
From airport security to wiretapping to racial profiling, in times of crisis, how do we balance the desire for personal freedom with the need for national security? An free article by Ed O'Brien in Social Education, November/December 2001.

9/11 and Terrorism: “The Ultimate Teachable Moment” in Textbooks and Supplemental Curricula
A survey of curricular materials developed to address 9/11 reveals there is great discrepancy on how the topic should be covered and what students should be learning. A free article by Diana Hess and Jeremy Stoddard in Social Education, September 2007.

Resources from Other Organizations

Oral History and September 11
From The Choices Program at the Brown University Watson Institute for International Studies, this lesson is designed to be completed over the course of two class periods—one day to prepare for the interviews, and one day for students to share what they learned from their interviews and debrief as a class.

Center for Middle Eastern Studies
The Harvard University Center for Middle Eastern Studies offers a range of free, online resources promoting discussion about the 10th anniversary of September 11th, 2001.

9/11 as History
This multi-dimensional, K-12 program and resource can help youth, parents, and educators address the anniversary of September 11th. When this free collection was first launched, entire school districts (e.g., Dallas, Texas and Phoenix, Arizona) adopted the curriculum. Families and Work Institute developed this resource.

Background and Lessons from FPRI
The Foreign Policy Research Institute provides free article and lesson plans (grade 6-12) on its website.

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