Economics

Slavery and Free Markets: Relationships between Economic Institutions


--Mark C. Schug
This look at the contradictions between economic freedom and slavery provides a comprehensive view of the institution of slavery in world and American history.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7702/77021382.pdf

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College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards


The result of a three year state-led collaborative effort, the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards was developed to serve two audiences - for states to upgrade their state social studies standards and for practitioners - local school districts, schools, teachers and curriculum writers to strengthen their social studies programs to a) enhance the rigor of the social studies disciplines, b) build critical thinking, problem solving, and participatory skills to become engaged citizens, and c) align academic programs to the Common Core State Standards f   --> read more »

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K-12 assessments from WA

Washington state developed assessments for social studies K-12. These resources give a general rubric and structure to be used to assess social studies skills and content. Teachers choose their own specific topics and formats, and the rubric provides uniformity in scoring structure.

Scroll down to the table and look at the models that are provided for each subject area and grade level.

Organization: 
Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction
Organization website: 
www.k12.wa.us
Contact: 
Carol Coe
Contact email: 
Carol.coe@k12.wa.us

Understanding Fiscal Responsibility (UFR): A Curriculum for Teaching about the Federal Budget, National Debt, and Budget Deficit


The 24 free lessons from Understanding Fiscal Responsibility (UFR): A Curriculum for Teaching about the Federal Budget, National Debt, and Budget Deficit (www.teachufr.org) connect students to the current public policy dilemmas about the federal budget, national debt, and budget deficit that confront the United States and its citizens. These 1-2 day lessons are not interdependent and are appropriate for students ranging from grades 9–12 in Civics/Government, Economics, U.S. History/Geography, World History/Global Studies/Geography, and Mathematics.   --> read more »

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National Financial Capability Challenge


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The U.S. Department of the Treasury and the U.S. Department of Education have teamed up to launch the National Financial Capability Challenge for 2010.

The Challenge is an initiative designed to engage educators in the teaching of personal finance, and to increase the financial knowledge and capability of high school aged youth across the United States so they can take control over their financial futures. All high school teachers (and other educators) are encouraged to sign up, prepare their students, and administer the voluntary online exam to help reach the goal of 1 million high school students taking the Challenge this year. Educators and top-scoring students in each school will earn personalized award certificates and states with the highest participation rates will also be recognized.
   --> read more »

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Hyperinflation and the Confederacy: An Interdisciplinary Lesson in Economics and History


--Brooke Graham Doyle
The Confederacy’s answer to revenue deficits during the Civil War was to print more money, leading to hyperinflation on an unprecedented scale.

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Money Panics and the Establishment of the Federal Reserve System (Lesson Plan)


—National Council on Economic Education, New York
An unregulated banking system in the nineteenth century contributed to a string of severe money panics. A short play in this lesson plan helps students understand why this happened and how today’s Federal Reserve System protects against panics.

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Keynesian, Monetarist and Supply-Side Policies: An Old Debate Gets New Life


By M. Scott Niederjohn and William C. Wood
Keynesian fiscal policy—out of fashion with economists and policymakers for decades—has enjoyed a revival under President Obama’s new economic policy team, but competing approaches also have their advocates.

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The Crash of 2008: Causes and Fed Response


By James D. Gwartney and Joseph Connors
The current economic crisis is primarily a story about unintended consequences and what happens when the incentive structure is damaged by unsound institutions and policies.

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