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NCSS Annual Conference Session Schedule

12/01/2016

7:15 am to 8:00 pm

7:15 am to 8:00 pm

1:00 pm to 5:00 pm

1:00 pm to 5:00 pm

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Teaching the World Wars through the Stories of the Fallen

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Host: American Battle Monuments Commission, Arlington, VA
America's overseas cemeteries and memorials offer a unique way to understand American memory. This hands-on, interdisciplinary workshop will be held at the offices of the American Battle Monuments Commission.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Timothy Nosal, American Battle Monuments Commission, Arlington, VA; Jennifer Rosenfeld, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, Fairfax, VA; Cathy Gorn, National History Day, College Park, MD


8:30 am to 5:00 pm

In Their Own Voices: Middle Eastern Perspectives in the Classroom

8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Visit several DC venues to experience the voices of Middle Eastern refugees, artists, comedians, musicians, and more. Receive a resource pack with many classroom-ready strategies for incorporating diverse, authentic perspectives!
Fee: $40 for members and nonmembers

Barbara Petzen, Middle East Outreach Council, Washington, DC; Susan Douglass, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Zeina Azzam, The Jerusalem Fund, Washington, DC; Craig Cangemi, Qatar Foundation International, Washington, DC; Emily Voight, Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center, Washington, DC; Megan Geissler, Middle East Policy Center, Washington, DC; Stephen Bennett, The George Washington University, Washington, DC


8:30 am to 6:00 pm

8:30 am to 6:00 pm

8:30 am to 4:00 pm

8:30 am to 4:00 pm

8:45 am to 12:45 pm

8:45 am to 12:45 pm

Visit Your Supreme Court

8:45 am to 12:45 pm

Host: Street Law, Silver Spring, MD
Spend a half day learning about the United States Supreme Court and the court building. We will spend time in:
• The Courtroom to learn about its history and architecture;
• One of the ceremonial conference rooms with officials from the Clerk’s office to learn how cases are processed at the Court and also how last-minute death penalty appeals are handled – sometimes in the middle of the night
• The exhibit area on the ground floor, where you can explore the rich history of the Court. You can also visit the gift shop, where NCSS participants on this tour will receive a 10% discount.
Fee: $40 for members and nonmembers

Lee Arbetman, Street Law, Silver Spring, MD

9:00 am to 12:00 pm

9:00 am to 12:00 pm

A Century of Women in Congress

9:00 am to 12:00 pm

Host: United States Capitol Visitors Center, Washington, DC

The House Historian’s Office, the Senate Historical Office, and the Capitol Visitor Center Exhibits and Education Division are pleased to offer this half-day educational clinic for teachers interested in learning more about the women who have served in the House and the Senate. Hosted at the Capitol Visitor Center, the clinic will offer a variety of instructional activities led by experts in the field.

Participants will:

  • Have the opportunity to learn about women who served in Congress with a special emphasis on the election of the first woman in Congress, Representative Jeannette Rankin, in 1916, through the groundbreaking “Year of the Woman” in 1992
  • Receive a behind-the-scenes look at a new oral history project featuring the recollections of women Representatives and House staff
  • Have the opportunity to speak with House and Senate historians and Capitol Visitor Center educational specialists about the historic role of women in Congress
  • Receive complimentary copies of the publications, Women in Congress,  Black Americans in Congress, and Hispanic Americans in Congress
  • Have the opportunity to view documents, objects, and photographs about women who served in Congress and receive tips on how to use these primary sources in the classroom
  • Receive an online tour of the educational resources available on House and Senate history

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Kathleen Johnson, Office of the Historian, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, DC; Kate Scott, Senate Historical Office, U.S. Senate, Washington, DC


9:00 am to 12:00 pm

Teaching about Global Conflict and Peace in a Changing World

9:00 am to 12:00 pm

Host: United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC Violent conflicts and subsequent humanitarian crises have set the world on fire. In the midst of the chaos, though, are countless people working to extinguish the fires through peacebuilding means. Visit the U.S. Institute of Peace for a behind-the-scenes introduction to the work of international peacebuilding. You will meet USIP experts who work in foreign conflict zones, deepen your understanding of complex global issues of conflict and peace, and discover resources to teach these themes. The program will also include a tour of USIP’s iconic headquarters, at the “War and Peace Corner” of the National Mall.

 

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Megan Chabalowski, U.S. Institute of Peace, Washington, DC


9:00 am to 3:00 pm

9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Teaching the American Revolution through Visual History

9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Host: Society of the Cincinnati, Washington, DC
Participants will analyze historical images of the Revolutionary War, highlighting its international dynamics, significant people and events, racial diversity and more. Participants will receive all images digitally, plus catered lunch.
Fee: $10 for members and nonmembers

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Eleesha Tucker, American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati, Washington, DC; Jack Warren , American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati, Washington, DC


9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Let's Talk! Getting Comfortable Discussing Race in Your Classroom

9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Host: National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Ever danced around the issue of race in your classroom? Join us to investigate challenges of talking about race, discuss ways to engage K-12 students and embrace those important conversations.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Candra Flanagan, National Museum of African American History and Culture - Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; Anna Hindley, National Museum of African American History and Culture - Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC


9:00 am to 3:30 pm

9:00 am to 3:30 pm

Still Fighting the Civil War, 150 Years after Appomattox

9:00 am to 3:30 pm

Why is it that a century-and-a-half after the guns went silent at Appomattox Court House, Americans still find themselves arguing and debating about the Civil War? What does this say about where we are as a nation in 2016? Join noted historian John Hennessy and noted history educator James Percoco along with staff of the Civil War Trust and Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership on a tour of Manassas National Battlefield. This clinic will examine how to avoid the pitfalls and minefields of the contested memory of the American Civil War, while exploring the site of the first major land battle of that war. Participants will receive a copy of Hennessey’s The First Battle of Manassas: An End to Innocence, July 18-21, 1861, and a list of related web sites, articles, and resources from which to engage students when discussing issues such as the Confederate Battle Flag and Confederate War Memorials. This clinic is aligned with the Common Core and the National Standards for United States History. Registration fees include all transportation and lunch costs as well as content materials and resources.
Fee: $80 for members and nonmembers

James Percoco, Civil War Trust/Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, Washington, DC; Jessie Aucoin, Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, Waterford, VA; Sam Smith, Civil War Trust, Washington, DC; John Hennessy, National Park Service, Washington, DC


9:00 am to 5:30 pm

9:00 am to 5:30 pm

The Civic Life of George Washington at Mount Vernon

9:00 am to 5:30 pm

Host: George Washington's Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon, VA
Tour the estate and grounds of our nation's first president, George Washington. Experience primary sources of all types including buildings, objects, and documents that connect this place with today's issues.
Fee: $35 for members and nonmembers

Allison Wickens, George Washington's Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon, VA


9:00 am to 4:00 pm

9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Past is Present: Teaching with the Holocaust Museum

9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Host: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC
The Holocaust resonates seventy years after it ended. Explore the US Holocaust Memorial Museum's exhibits and participate in new classroom lessons, receive free resources and discuss the Holocaust's relevance today.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Peter Fredlake, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC; Christina Chavarria, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC; David Klevan, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC


9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Preparing NCSS/CAEP Program Reports

9:00 am to 4:00 pm

This clinic will prepare participants to review teacher preparation programs in socal studies or related disciplines and to update current reviewers in applying NCSS Standards for the CAEP Program Review Process.  

Fee: $300 for members, $360 for nonmembers

Presenter: Brandie Benton, Henderson State University, Arkadelphia, AR
Higher Education

9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Civil Rights, the Constitution and the National Archives

9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Host: National Archives, Washington, DC
Join National Archives educators for an engaging and fun-filled day exploring exhibits, discovering programs and researching primary sources related to the Bill of Rights and you!

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Mary Clare McNatt, National Archives, Washington, DC


2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

9:30 am to 1:30 pm

9:30 am to 1:30 pm

Using Portraiture to Teach a Socratic Seminar

9:30 am to 1:30 pm

Host: National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Learn how to teach your students to discuss a dynamic historical text and a visual portrait, in tandem, through the context of a student-led Socratic Seminar. Materials provided.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is within walking distance of the convention center.

Briana Zavadil White, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; Amy Trenkle, Alice Deal Middle School, Washington, DC


9:30 am to 3:30 pm

9:30 am to 3:30 pm

DC: The Monumental City

9:30 am to 3:30 pm

This bus and walking tour visits the monuments of Washington and Arlington with a White House stop. Commentary and narrative is provided by two veteran DC tour guides/college history professors.
Fee: $30 for members and nonmembers

Rich Loosbrock, Adams State University, Alamosa, CO; Ed Crowther, Adams State University, Alamosa, CO


9:30 am to 1:00 pm

9:30 am to 1:00 pm

Perspectives on History: Interrogating American Art

9:30 am to 1:00 pm

Host: Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Washington, DC
Use artwork to zoom in on key issues in American history. Zoom out to see those issues at play in today's world. Inquiry strategies will prompt evidence-based reasoning and argumentation.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is within walking distance of the convention center.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Peg Koetsch, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC


10:00 am to 4:00 pm

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

A Lens on the World: Film, Global Education, and Cultural Literacy

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Learn how to make the most of foreign films to introduce your students to other cultures and learn about global issues. Participants will view films and receive free lesson plans.
Fee: $30 for members, $45 for nonmembers

Eileen Mattingly, Journeys in Film, Placitas, NM


10:00 am to 4:00 pm

A Different Kind of Classroom: Engaging Inquiry and Literacy Strategies

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

The C3 Framework and Common Core State Standards call for shifts in our teaching within the inquiry arc, literacy, and critical thinking. This institute will model practical engaging teaching strategies for implementing these shifts.
Fee: $30 for members, $45 for nonmembers

Michael Yell, Hudson Middle School/Past President NCSS, Hudson, WI; Geoffrey Scheurman, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, River Falls, WI


10:00 am to 4:00 pm
10:00 am to 4:00 pm
10:00 am to 4:00 pm
10:00 am to 4:00 pm
10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Finally, an Answer for Elementary Teachers

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Shifts in ELA and Social Studies, the C3 Framework and best practice instruction related to the elementary classroom with interactive activities and resources are the basis for this clinic.
Fee: $30 for members, $45 for nonmembers

Kim Heckart, College Community School District, Cedar Rapids, IA; Rebecca Hellund, Pella Community School District, Pella, IA; Katy Swalwell, Iowa State University, Ames, IA


10:00 am to 4:00 pm

Teaching the Holocaust and Related Issues through Anne Frank

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

New educational tools, using the life and Diary of Anne Frank as a starting point, will be presented. The format is highly interactive.
Fee: $30 for members, $45 for nonmembers

Barry van Driel, Cihan Tekeli, Anne Frank House, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Charles Vaughan, AC Flora High School, Columbia, SC; Doyle Stevick, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC


12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

12:00 pm to 4:00 pm

12:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Building Social Understanding with National Public Radio

12:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Host: National Public Radio, Washington, DC

This NPR headquarters clinic and tour will give educators the tools to help their students build social understanding and global awareness by discovering how a thoughtful look at news can enrich their understanding of history.

These issues are best examined with good storytelling. In this clinic led by NPR and Listen Current, explore how to use public radio in the classroom to connect learning to real world events. The presentation will combine teaching strategies, research, and concrete examples of how to integrate podcasts into the social studies curriculum to facilitate students’ civic awareness and engagement. Learn how you can use podcasts to build important 21st century skills including listening, reading, critical thinking, problem solving, and empathy.

Bring your tablets or laptops to sign on and explore as we share the many ways to integrate global current events with Listen Current’s curated public radio stories in the classroom. This clinic will be facilitated by a social studies teacher who uses many of these methods. The teacher will share scenarios of how the tools work in their classroom. Attendees will leave a list of websites and teaching strategies to help teachers convey a fluent historical, political, and cultural understanding of ideas that define our world.

Fee: $35 for members, $45 for nonmembers

Monica Brady Myerov, Listenwise, Boston, MA

1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

1:30 pm to 2:30 pm

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Youth Voices, Youth Vote

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Host: National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Encourage and empower students to get involved in the political process with interactive programming and primary source-based lessons on advocacy and the vote and new research on youth voting.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Naomi Coquillon, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Washington, DC; Abby Pfisterer, Morven Park Center for Civic Impact, Leesburg, VA; Abby Kiesa, CIRCLE, the Center for Information and Research on Civic Engagement, Washington, DC


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Geography as Inquiry: Bringing People and Places to Life

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Geography is defined as art, social science, and science. Participants will explore the world through case studies of such key issues as borders and passages, conservation and exploitation, and sustainability.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Jack Zevin, Queens College, Flushing, NY; Mark Newman, National Louis University, Chicago, IL


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Teaching the Civil War through a Social/Emotional Learning Framework

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Experience how an inquiry-based learning approach uses the narrative structure of Storypath to enhance student engagement and create "the lived experience" for historical, civic, and social/emotional learning. Curriculum provided.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Margit McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Cultural Genocide against Native Peoples in the U.S.: Findings from a Truth and Reconciliation Commission

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Unprecedented truth and reconciliation commission on forced removal of Native children explored in film and related curricula. Was it cultural genocide? Learn to teach this story. Free film and curriculum.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Watertown, MA; Adam Mazo, Upstander Project, Boston, MA; Nikki Ulrich, Close Up Foundation, Alexandria, VA


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Successfully Create a World Religions Elective in Your High School

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Replace that fear of teaching about World Religions in school with the courage, resources, and support you need to empower your students to be global citizens. Learn as well how to avoid controversies teachers have faced around the country, especially regarding lessons on Islam, when they brought in guest speakers, let students try on religious garb, and went on field trips.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Chris Murray, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD; Murali Balaji , Hindu American Foundation, Washington, DC; Linda K. Wertheimer, author of Faith Ed, Teaching About Religion In An Age of Intolerance, Boston, MA; Benjamin Marcus, Religious Freedom Center, Washington, DC


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Using Inquiry to Discover Washington DC

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Find treasure in Chinatown, discover the secrets of the National Mall, and pay tribute to fallen heroes. Join a hands-on exploration of Washington, DC using inquiry as our guide.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Paul Nagel, Hempstead High School, Cypress, TX; David Faerber, Lee Magnet High School, Baton Rouge, LA


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

A Historical Perspective on the Arab-Israeli Conflict and Peace Process

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

High school world history, geography, and global studies teachers will deepen their pedagogic content knowledge in this dynamic workshop, which emphasizes inquiry based learning using Teaching with Primary Sources strategies.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Jacqueline Regev, Institute for Curriculum Services, San Francisco, CA


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Tech + Narrative = Engaged Students

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Harness the power of primary sources with Historical Narrative Inquiry! Foster the curiosity of learners to evaluate primary sources and create historical narratives on interactive timelines. Device needed.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Thomas Ketchell, HSTRY, Boston, MA


2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

The Threshold Project: Helping Students Understand Complex Global Issues

2:00 pm to 5:00 pm

The "Threshold Project" is a problem-based learning experience that uses the rule of law to help students identify and design solutions to complex global issues.
Fee: $20 for members, $35 for nonmembers

Timothy Isaacs, Center for Teaching the Rule of Law, Salem, VA; Michael Pace, Center for Teaching the Rule of Law, Salem, VA; Scott Crawford, The Center for Teaching the Rule of Law, Salem, VA


2:00 pm to 5:30 pm

2:00 pm to 5:30 pm

The Secret History of History

2:00 pm to 5:30 pm

Host: International Spy Museum, Washington, DC

Teaching history through the lens of intelligence is not only timely but timeless. In a post 9/11 world a focus on intelligence and its role through history is critical. Join International Spy Museum staff for a 2,000 year journey through the secret history of history. Enter the shadow world of espionage in this clinic which will provide a keynote presentation with a former spy, an exploration of the Museum's artifacts and stories, and hands-on simulation and lesson demonstrations with the Museum's educators. Each participant will leave with a comprehensive packet of resources, the Museum's Cuban Missile Crisis simulation publication, and a newfound appreciation for how spying has often changed the course of history.

*Designed for secondary teachers. Cost includes a USB with SPY's lesson plans and resources and Museum admission.
Fee: $25 for members, $40 for nonmembers

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is within walking distance of the convention center.

Jacqueline Eyl, International Spy Museum, Washington, DC; Lucy Stirn, International Spy Museum, Washington, DC; Vince Houghton, International Spy Museum, Washington, DC


2:00 pm to 5:30 pm

Washington DC: A Capitol Classroom for Onsite Civic Learning

2:00 pm to 5:30 pm

Host: Close Up Foundation, Alexandria, VA

The city is your classroom at NCSS! Join this hands-on history and civic learning opportunity in Washington, DC. Whether you're visiting for the first time or your tenth, you will learn something you can take with you to your classroom. You will explore the Jefferson, FDR, and Martin Luther King memorials, where you will learn the history behind these remarkable sites and interact with them as never before, using a civic lens to understand how monuments can be explored by your students as a teaching tool. You will also travel beyond the marble monuments to Lincoln Park and Eastern Market, to look at the Capitol Hill neighborhoods and learn the history of Washington, DC.  Don’t miss this chance to explore Washington and take in all that the city has to offer while learning new ways to teach history and civics using place based learning. 

MaryBeth Wagner, Close Up Foundation, Alexandria, VA; Dan Wallace, Close Up Foundation, Alexandria, VA


2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

From Clickbait to Content: Tips for Teaching Current Events

2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Host: Newseum, Washington, DC
Help your students become savvy information consumers. Interact with media experts, peers and international industry insiders to gain strategies and ready-to-use resources for teaching media literacy to foster global citizenship.

NOTE: Attendees are on their own to reach this clinic, which is accessible by Metro.

Barbara Pearson, Newseum, Washington, DC; Barbara McCormack, Newseum, Washington, DC


5:00 pm to 7:30 pm

5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
12/02/2016

7:00 am to 8:45 am

7:00 am to 8:45 am

8:45 am to 9:45 am

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Using Primary Sources to Teach about Hinduism

8:45 am to 9:45 am
144B

Learn how to use Hindu texts as primary sources and relate them to contemporary Hindu practices.

Murali Balaji, Hindu American Foundation, Washington, DC; Christopher Murray, Walter Johnson High School, Bethesda, MD
Secondary/High School World History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

VBQs: The Video-Based Question Activity

8:45 am to 9:45 am
103B

Video-Based Questions uses Google forms and video/media to engage learners and allows students to control the pace of their learning.

Kelly Grotrian, East Brunswick Public Schools, East Brunswick, NJ
Secondary/High School US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Using Teacher Feedback to Plan a Cohesive, Varied PD Program

8:45 am to 9:45 am
201

Planning the perfect professional development is challenging! Explore Boston Public Schools' strategy to develop a plan that incorporated place-based learning, professional learning communities, and digital learning strategies.

Natacha Scott, Boston Public Schools, Roxbury, MA; Kerry Dunne, Boston Public Schools, Roxbury, MA; Josue Sakata, Boston Public Schools, Roxbury, MA
Supervisory-Administrative US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Social Psychology through Civic Engagement

8:45 am to 9:45 am
142

This presentation focuses on teaching social psychology through the lens of the election process, specifically how the candidates' behaviors, policies, and appearance influence citizens' choices. Resources will be provided.

Trish Everett, Pine Crest School, Fort Lauderdale, FL; Kerri-Anne Alexanderson, Pine Crest School, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Secondary/High School Psychology

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Question Bridge: Transforming Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for Black Male Students

8:45 am to 9:45 am
204B

Question Bridge is designed to redefine the image of African American males. The goal is to create dialogue, discourse, and incorporate pedagogical orientations; and to discover alienation, implications, and its effects.

Lashunda Reynolds, McKinley Technology High School, Washington, DC; Chris Johnson, California College of the Arts/ Question Bridge, Oakland, CA; Laura Hoffman, The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School Social Sciences

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Asia Community Scholar Strand Proposal

8:45 am to 9:45 am
202B

This is a placeholder for Asia Community's participation in the Scholar Strand

Anne Prescott, Five Colleges, Inc., Northampton, MA
Secondary/High School Social Sciences

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Sunken and Seized Ships: What Warrants War?

8:45 am to 9:45 am
207B

From the shores of Tripoli to Iranian waters, U.S. Naval forces long have engaged with foreign powers. Learn how students explored such situations to deliberate about what warrants war.

Brian Bechard, Olathe Public Schools, Olathe, KS; Kori Green, El Dorado Public Schools, El Dorado, KS; Chris Fellows, Summit Lakes Middle School, Lee's Summit, MO
Middle Level Global Connections

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Teaching Academics to Generation Z Students through Music and the Performing Arts

8:45 am to 9:45 am
140B

Learn about and come away with tested activities and strategies that use music and art as a supplementary curriculum to engage and teach today's generation of multi-media learners.

Jonathan Schwartz, N/A, Recently Retired, CA
PreK-Elementary US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Through Chinatown's Eyes: Racial Identity during Washington, DC's 1968 Riots

8:45 am to 9:45 am
103A

Filmmaker Penny Lee's documentary reveals how Chinese Americans, neither black nor white, saw their lives and neighborhoods threatened and transformed by rioting that rocked Chinatown following Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination.

Ting-Yi Oei, 1882 Foundation, Washington, DC; Ted Gong, 1882 Foundation, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Disciplinary Literacy and the Quest for Balance in Social Studies Instruction

8:45 am to 9:45 am
141

The connection between social studies and literacy has led to some important debates in the field for decades. This session presents a balanced model for integrating social studies and literacy, arguing that literacy education is citizenship education and offering a theoretical and practical model for designing disciplinary literacy-based lessons.

Allen Guidry, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
Secondary/High School Social Sciences

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Words as Historical Sources: Words of the Year and Inquiry

8:45 am to 9:45 am
140A

What can Words of the Year teach us about historical inquiry? Learn how online dictionaries serve as fertile ground for academic language development, comprehension, and disciplinary inquiry (perspectives, contextualization, and sourcing).

Tina Heafner, UNC Charlotte, Kernersville, NC
Secondary/High School US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Understanding the Tests Now to Improve Your AP Students' Performance in the Future

8:45 am to 9:45 am
208A

Get samples, ideas and techniques to improve both awareness of the tests and examples of ways to use the test in your teaching.

Bruce Damasio, Towson University, Towson, MD
Secondary/High School Economics

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Asia Matters: What Your Students Need to Know

8:45 am to 9:45 am
147B

Walk in to explore the dramatic and dynamic changes taking place across Asia today. Walk out with dozens of ready-to-go lessons designed to stimulate student curiosity about why Asia matters.

Tese Wintz Neighbor, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Yurika Kurakata, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Secondary/High School Global Connections

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Sociological Perspective and Social Structure: ASA National Standards Domains 1&2

8:45 am to 9:45 am
149B

First session in three-part symposium. Introduces strategies to teach the core concepts of social structure and social theory from the first two ASA National Standards domains--and the interplay between them.

Hayley Lotspeich, Wheaton North High School, Wheaton, IL; Chris Salituro, Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL; Jean Shin, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC; Margaret Vitullo, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC; Beth Floyd, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School Social Sciences

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Islamophobia: Getting Islam Right in the Classroom

8:45 am to 9:45 am
144C

Explore content and strategies from cultural, media, and community leaders to support teachers in classroom discussion. The panelists will delve into their industry's handling of issues affecting the Muslim community.

Jayson Wilkinson, DC Public Schools, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School Global Connections

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Spy School 113: Incorporating Espionage Skills in Your Classroom

8:45 am to 9:45 am
143B

Observation, analysis, team building and critical thinking are skills used by both spies and students. Learn how to utilize the International Spy Museum's unique resources in your classroom.

Jacqueline Eyl, International Spy Museum, Washington, DC; Lucy Stirn, International Spy Museum, Washington, DC
Middle Level Civics/Government

8:45 am to 9:45 am

New Directions For Inquiry: Citizen Student Archivists Crowdsourcing the Past

8:45 am to 9:45 am
207A

How can crowdsourcing support inquiry-based learning? Find out through Mapping the Fourth of July - a crowdsourced archive where students investigate how Americans celebrated July 4th during the Civil War era.

Paul Quigley, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Kurt Luther, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; David Hicks, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Daniel Newcomb, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Secondary/High School US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Out of Washington's Shadow: Teaching with the Voices of Enslaved Early Americans

8:45 am to 9:45 am
143A

Enslaved people lived alongside the Founders, yet these individuals' stories are rarely told. Enrich teaching of early America with enslaved voices, using student-friendly text, primary sources, and classroom activities.

Jessica Ellison, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN
Middle Level US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

So, You Want to Teach the Presidency?

8:45 am to 9:45 am
145B

Learn methods for teaching and learning about the U.S. presidency in this interactive and Constitution-based program. The White House Historical Association will share resources for the classroom.

Courtney Speckmann, White House Historical Association, Washington, DC; Breanne Burke, White House Historical Association, Washington, DC
PreK-Elementary Civics/Government

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Research-into-Practice Lecture: Ordinary People/Extraordinary Circumstances: Reimagining Diversity in Civic Education

8:45 am to 9:45 am
204A

This workshop presents exemplary social studies research for practitioners. Dr. Ashley Woodson addresses the oversimplification of civil rights leaders as civic superheroes, and ways to expand Black students' civic imaginations.​

Christine Baron, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY; Joseph Feinberg, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA; Michael Berson, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Middle Level Civics/Government

8:45 am to 9:45 am

The New American Battlefield: The Civil War in National Memory

8:45 am to 9:45 am
203B

Learn how students can become the front line of the battle to encourage the preservation of memory and the fields of glory fought over during the Civil War.

David Kendrick, Civil War Trust, Athens, GA; James Percoco, Civil War Trust/Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, Washington, DC; Jessie Aucoin, Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, Waterford, VA; Robert Rinehart, Civil War Trust, Bel Air, MD; Joe Foster, Civil War Trust/Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership, Waynesfield, OH
Middle Level US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

How Do You Get an Entire School to Embrace Civic Learning?

8:45 am to 9:45 am
203A

The California Democracy School Initiative guarantees high quality civic learning for all students across entire grade spans. Acquire strategies, resources, and leadership techniques to replicate the model in YOUR school/district.

Michelle Herczog, Los Angeles County Office of Education, Downey, CA
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Saving Geography and Art through PBL, Co-Teaching, and S.T.E.A.M. Education

8:45 am to 9:45 am
204C

See the benefits of a co-taught classroom in fostering authentic Project-Based Learning with Geography and Art. STEAM-based projects include global learning, social justice, and cultural diversity.

Lieu Nguyen, Charles R. Drew Charter School, Senior Academy, Atlanta, GA; David Cruz Vega, Charles R. Drew Charter School, Senior Academy, Atlanta, GA; Jennifer Ulbrich, Charles R. Drew Charter School, Senior Academy, Atlanta, GA
Secondary/High School Geography

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Overcoming Bias Using Pros & Cons: Inquiry-Based Learning Bonanza

8:45 am to 9:45 am
149A

Using pros and cons can help students to overcome bias, stimulate critical thinking, and drive inquiry-based learning strategies. Learn great methods to apply contrasting viewpoints on important social issues.

Kamy Akhavan, ProCon.org, Santa Monica, CA
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

8:45 am to 9:45 am

DocsTeach: A Primary Source-Based Teaching Tool from the National Archives

8:45 am to 9:45 am
147A

Join the National Archives to discover DocsTeach.org and its new features. Learn to find, customize, and create primary source-based student activities that promote historical thinking and build inquiry skills.

Stephanie Greenhut, National Archives, Washington, DC; Jenny Sweeney, National Archives, Fort Worth, TX; Chris Zarr, National Archives, New York, NY
Secondary/High School US History

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Working Together! Interdisciplinary Civic Inquiry English + Civics = Solutions

8:45 am to 9:45 am
144A

See how English and civics teachers work together to engage students in a series of strategies that allow students to research current issues and propose Mock Congress bills as solutions to real problems.

Anton Schulzki, William J. Palmer High School, Colorado Springs, CO; Adrienne Hause, William J. Palmer High School, Colorado Springs, CO
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Carter G. Woodson & Notable Tradebooks: Engaging Upper Elementary/Middle Lesson Plans

8:45 am to 9:45 am
206

Searching for compelling upper elementary/middle grade lesson plans tied to NCSS Notable Tradebooks and Carter Woodson winning titles? Look no further! Participants will receive all lesson plans.

JoAnn Wood, www.appleseedclass.com, Marietta, GA; Lynne Farrell Stover, James Madison University, Center for Economic Education, Harrisonburg, VA; Janie Hubbard, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Melinda Odom Staubs, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL; Marilyn Ward, Carthage College, Kenosha, WI; Lara Willox, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; Paige Lilley-Schulte, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA; Sarah Hartman, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, GA; Mellanie Robinson, Reinhardt University, Waleska, GA; Deborah Morowski, Auburn University, Chicago, IL; Theresa McCormick, Auburn University, Auburn, AL; Dominic Lorann, Carthage College, Kenosha, WI; Jeanette Balantic, Garden City Public Schools, Garden City, NY
PreK-Elementary Social Sciences

8:45 am to 9:45 am

Understanding the Armenian Genocide through Testimony, Film, and Photographs

8:45 am to 9:45 am
143C

Photographs, film and testimony of survivors provide a compelling lens to better understand the impact of the Armenian Genocide. Participants will receive materials that are applicable for classroom use.

Sara Cohan, The Genocide Education Project, Nashville, TN
Secondary/High School World History

8:45 am to 9:15 am

8:45 am to 9:15 am

Echoes from the Wall: Teaching the Impact of the Vietnam Era

8:45 am to 9:15 am
209A

The founders of the Vietnam Memorial discuss how to teach the Vietnam war/era in the 21st century with a grounding in inquiry-based learning.

Reema Ghazi, Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School US History

8:45 am to 9:15 am

Reducing Marginalization of Civic Education through Partnership and Research

8:45 am to 9:15 am
209C

Learn how the partnership between a local civic advocacy group and educational researchers used local voices to begin reversing the marginalization of social studies in a large urban school district.

Gayle Thieman, Portland State University, Washougal, WA; Pat Burk, Portland State University, Portland, OR
Higher Education

8:45 am to 9:15 am

When 2nd Meets 7th: A Collaborative Approach to Immigration

8:45 am to 9:15 am
209B

Discover how a cross-grade partnership can motivate and engage students. Walk away with examples and templates to create your own partnership unit.

Hope Svendsen, Far Hills Country Day School, Far Hills, NJ; Kathy Rubin, Far Hills Country Day School, Far Hills, NJ
Middle Level US History

9:20 am to 9:50 am

9:20 am to 9:50 am

Mouth Shut, Eyes Open, Heart Engaged: Culture and Family Stories

9:20 am to 9:50 am
209C

Valuing cultural diversity is important in making a positive impact on student achievement. Learn about the inquiry-based Family Stories strategy teachers can use to uncover and honor students' cultures.

Diana Murdock, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC; Erin Hamel, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC
Higher Education Global Connections

9:20 am to 9:50 am

9/11/2013: The Heroes of Flight 93: Never Forget

9:20 am to 9:50 am
209A

Did that really happen? Facilitating your students' development of a more comprehensive perception of current and historical events by exposing them to thought-provoking discussions with local experts.

Linda McMillan, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA; Mahlon Fuller, Friends of Flight 93 National Memorial, Elizabethtown, PA
Secondary/High School US History

9:20 am to 9:50 am

Create, Explore, Connect: Teaching Digital Stories on Immigration

9:20 am to 9:50 am
209B

Learn how to easily launch a student-centered digital story project on immigration and explore how immigration narratives facilitate critical thinking and engagement while building community with students and families.

Claire Tesh, American Immigration Council, Washington, DC; Callie Hawkins, President Lincoln's Cottage, Washington, DC
Middle Level Global Connections

10:00 am to 11:00 am

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Can I Come In? Political Borders and Human Migration

10:00 am to 11:00 am
147B

Who draws the line? Explore how the division and reunification of Germany provide context for lessons about refugees, immigration, and civic ideals today. Complimentary curriculum and study tour information.

Lou Kindschi, Oregon High School, Oregon, WI; Jennifer Windell, Transatlantic Outreach Program, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School Global Connections

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Becoming Citizens or Citizens Already?

10:00 am to 11:00 am
141

Democratic educators and scholars argue schooling should help children develop into informed and engaged adult citizens. This perspective suggests children are citizens-in-the-making rather than citizens already. Join the presenter to explore the possibilities that emerge when the complex ways children read and write about their world are recognized as civic.

Jessica F. Kobe, Jennifer Hauver James, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
PreK-Elementary Civics/Government

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Psychology Community Scholar Strand

10:00 am to 11:00 am
202B

This is a placeholder for the Psychology Community's participation in the Scholar Strand.

Daria Schaffeld, Prospect High School, Mt. Prospect, IL; Joe Geiger, Carl Sandburg High School, Orland Park, IL; Jennifer Schlicht, Olathe South High School, Olathe, KS; Sejal Schullo, Glenbrook South High School, Glenview, IL
Secondary/High School US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Making Great Americans: Civics Education for Immigrant and ELL Students

10:00 am to 11:00 am
203A

Discover how to use project-based and experiential learning to deepen and enrich learning for immigrants and English language learners in the civics and government classrooms.

Jared Peet, T.C. Williams High School, International Academy, Alexandria, VA
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Breathing New Life into State Studies

10:00 am to 11:00 am
204A

Tired of the old state studies report? Learn how an inquiry-based process builds knowledge and understanding about states. Using the Storypath approach, students explore states integrating Common Core standards.

Margit McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA; Bridget Walker, Sound Supports K-12, Mukilteo, WA
PreK-Elementary Geography

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Engaging Inquiry Strategies for C3 Framework Success with American History

10:00 am to 11:00 am
143A

Inquiry strategies promote critical thinking, analysis of primary sources, argumentation, and social studies vocabulary. Explore interactive, easily implemented strategies that boost success with the C3 Framework and American history.

Vivian Bernstein, Core Learning, Inc., Oceanside, NY
Middle Level US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Engaging Assessment Strategies for High and Low Tech Classrooms

10:00 am to 11:00 am
203B

Whether you're in a one-to-one or a one-computer classroom environment, there will be formative and summative assessment strategies you can use tomorrow for grades 3-12.

Rena Shifflet, Illinois State University, Normal, IL
Middle Level US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Carter G. Woodson Books in the Classroom

10:00 am to 11:00 am
145A

Strategies for using Carter G. Woodson Book Award books in the classroom will be shared.

Ana (Award Session Place Holder) Post, NCSS, Silver Spring, MD
Middle Level Civics/Government

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Why Do We Rescue? Decision-Making and Risk-Taking during the Holocaust

10:00 am to 11:00 am
143C

Explore issues of choice and rescue during the Holocaust while also learning how to seamlessly incorporate Common Core literacy strategies in your teaching.

Brittany Burns, Algonquin Regional High School, Northborough, MA
Secondary/High School World History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

I Wish to Inquire about My People: 19th-Century African Americans

10:00 am to 11:00 am
140A

Students investigate Lost Friends ads and other first-person sources by former slaves seeking loved ones to illuminate the experience of African American communities in the past. Extension activities included.

Emmet Quinn, Saint Johnsbury Academy, Saint Johnsbury, VT
Secondary/High School US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Economics, Environment, and Empathy: Photographing Contemporary Global Issues

10:00 am to 11:00 am
144C

Contemporary issues can be examined through modern photographic art. In this interactive session, explore global issues through the work of contemporary artists, and receive supporting resources.

Barbara Cruz, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Cheryl Ellerbrock, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Sarah Mead, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Secondary/High School Global Connections

10:00 am to 11:00 am

A University Wide Approach: Facilitating Cultural Responsiveness and Social Justice Education

10:00 am to 11:00 am
207B

Cultural responsiveness is critical to social justice, but how do we approach this in the classroom? The session explores one university's multi-tiered, inquiry approach for incorporating social justice frameworks.

Amy Samuels, University of Montevallo, Birmingham, AL; Gregory Samuels, University of Montevallo, Birmingham, AL
Higher Education

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Justice Inquiry: Examining the Civil Rights Movement through Primary Sources

10:00 am to 11:00 am
143B

Receive extensive strategies and resources on the Civil Rights Movement from the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, AL, that you can use immediately. Interactive format. All grades.

Susan Santoli, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL; Susan DuBose, Elmore County Public Schools, Wetumpka, AL
Middle Level Civics/Government

10:00 am to 11:00 am

All Rights Matter: Students and Criminal Procedure

10:00 am to 11:00 am
149A

James Madison Fellows present lessons about constitutional guarantees of due process. Learn to what extent the guarantees of the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th amendments apply to youth and adults.

Claire Griffin, James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation, Alexandria, VA
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Carter G. Woodson & Notable Tradebooks: Engaging Early Grade Lesson Plans!

10:00 am to 11:00 am
206

Searching for compelling early grade lesson plans tied to NCSS Notable Tradebooks and Carter Woodson winning titles? Look no further! Participants will receive all lesson plans.

JoAnn Wood, www.appleseedclass.com, Marietta, GA; Cynthia Szymanski Sunal, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Dennis W. Sunal, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Amanda Pendergrass, University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL; Lynn Kelley, University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL; Angel Bestwick, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA; Holly HIbolt Swain, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Emma Abler, Cathage College, Kenosha, WI; Lois McFayden Christensen, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Lee Freeman, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Courtney Grever, Carthage College Student, Kenosha, WI; Sarah Montgomery, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA; Andrea Libresco, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
PreK-Elementary Social Sciences

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Using Music to Teach Social Justice and Diversity

10:00 am to 11:00 am
207A

Music teaches social justice and diversity in any grade. Learn how to open hearts and minds with traditional Native American chants, historical ballads, and songs of Springsteen and Johnny Cash.

Jeff Passe, The College of NJ, Ewing, NJ; Stephanie DiFrancesco, The River School, Washington, DC; Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Dayna Orlak, Waldwick Public Schools, Waldwick, NJ
Middle Level Social Sciences

10:00 am to 11:00 am

At the Core: Social Studies Inquiry, Engagement, and Common Core Skills

10:00 am to 11:00 am
103B

Learn how to engage students with inquiry, having social studies content as the focus, while fulfilling the Common Core State Standards, and increasing rigor. Receive ready-to-use lessons and handouts.

Donna Knoell, Shawnee Mission, KS
PreK-Elementary US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Blended Learning in Economics Classrooms

10:00 am to 11:00 am
208A

Learn how to use differentiated instruction and blended learning together in the classroom to improve student learning, and explore several newer technology apps/games.

Nicholas Anello, Homewood Flossmoor High School, Flossmoor, IL; David Kush, Homewood Flossmoor High School, Flossmoor, IL; Carl Coates, Homewood Flossmoor High School, Flossmoor, IL
Secondary/High School Economics

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Your Students Could be G.I.A.N.T.S.

10:00 am to 11:00 am
142

This interactive session has it all: free curricular units, online assessments, interactive maps, instructional strategies, and digital textbooks that build geographic inquiry and historical thinking skills for middle school students.

Rebecca Bush, Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, Holland, MI
Middle Level Global Connections

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Gold Mountain and Angel Island: Chinese Immigrants in the U.S.: 1848-1943

10:00 am to 11:00 am
147A

Learn the motivations, experiences and contributions of nineteenth-century Chinese immigrants to the United States, and analyze the persecution and legal exclusion of the Chinese from 1882-1943.

Carol Pixton, Polytechnic School, Claremont, CA
Secondary/High School US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am
10:00 am to 11:00 am

Charting Contemporary Social Studies Education with NCSS Yearbooks

10:00 am to 11:00 am
144A

The presenters will draw on ideas from NCSS Yearbooks to suggest four activities for social studies disciplines. The four activities discussed are connected to the goals of the C3 Framework.

Jeremiah Clabough, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Dwight Herold, Iowa Council for the Social Studies, Ames, IA
Middle Level

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Teaching Socialization, Stratification, and Inequality: ASA National Standards Domains 3&4

10:00 am to 11:00 am
149B

Second session in three-part symposium. Focuses on lessons to help students understand how individual people and societal forces can interact as reciprocal influences within the context of stratification and inequality.

Chris Salituro, Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL; Hayley Lotspeich, Wheaton North High School, Wheaton, IL; Margaret Vitullo, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC; Beth Floyd, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC; Jean Shin, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC
Secondary/High School Social Sciences

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Surviving a Plague: LGBT History in the Social Studies Classroom

10:00 am to 11:00 am
103A

Introduce students to the gay rights documentary How to Survive a Plague, making explicit connections to the social studies curricula. Discussion questions and resources will be provided.

Lisa Pennington, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Cathy Brant, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC
Secondary/High School US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

A Technology Showcase for You and Your Students

10:00 am to 11:00 am
204B

Learn about and engage in technology-related best practices designed to help students make global connections. Then follow us to the tech lounge for one-on-one mentoring!

Nick Lawrence, East Bronx Academy for the Future, Bronx, NY; Jen Schlicht, Olathe South High School, Olathe, KS; Alexander Ledford, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Ed Finney, Maple Hill Middle School, Castleton-on-Hudson, NY; Brian Bechard, Mission Trail Middle School, Olathe, KS; Joshua Patterson, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Secondary/High School Social Sciences

10:00 am to 11:00 am

From Non-Racism to Anti-Racism in Social Studies Education

10:00 am to 11:00 am
3rd Fl

Community sponsored scholar session discusses the content of the journal article, From Non-Racism to Anti-Racism in Social Studies Education: Social studies and racial pedagogical content knowledge.

LaGarrett King, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO; Prentice Chandler, University of Cincinnati, Cincinatti, OH
Secondary/High School US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

You've Got Issues. You Just Didn't Know It

10:00 am to 11:00 am
140B

Learn how to issue-ize existing instructional units in American History and World History by applying an issues-centered focus to increase student engagement, understanding and responsibility.

Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown, Johnstown, PA; Ronald Evans, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; Kim Koeppen, Hamline University, St. Paul, MN; Scott Wylie, Chaminade University of Honolulu, New York, NY; Gregg Jorgensen, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL; Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, NY; William Fernekes, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Examining a Historic Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the U.S.: Can Teachers Change Attitudes and Discourse about Native Peoples?

10:00 am to 11:00 am
145B

Discover how to teach the story of the unprecedented Truth and Reconciliation Commission on forced removal of Native children with a new documentary and its teaching resources, including a free film and curriculum.

Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Watertown, MA; Adam Mazo, Upstander Project, Boston, MA
Secondary/High School US History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Inquiry Matters! Implementing the C3 Framework in Your School

10:00 am to 11:00 am
144B

Three teachers and high school social studies specialists detail the process of getting the C3 Framework into the instructional repertoire of educators in Fairfax County (VA) Public Schools. Resources provided.

Craig Perrier, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA; Lauren Burda, Mount Vernon High School, Alexandria, VA; Samantha Reynolds, Chantilly High School, Chantilly, VA; Christina Vandenbergh, Madison High School, Vienna, VA
Secondary/High School World History

10:00 am to 11:00 am

Analyzing Population Change in Your Community, Country, and World Using Live Web Maps

10:00 am to 11:00 am
204C

Using live web maps, students analyze the wheres, whys, and hows of population change, lifestyles, diversity, age, income, and other variables in their own neighborhoods, region, country, and the world.

Joseph Kerski, University of Denver, Denver, CO
Secondary/High School Geography

10:00 am to 10:30 am

10:00 am to 10:30 am

Primary-Source Lessons for U.S. Government or History Classes

10:00 am to 10:30 am
209C

Learn powerful ways to use primary sources in your U.S. government or history class and gain access to free, short, primary source lessons online.

Stephen Masyada, FL Joint Center for Citizenship, Orlando, FL; Valerie McVey, FL Joint Center for Citizenship, Orlando, FL; Charles Flanagan, National Archives, the Center for Legislative Archives, Washington, DC; Jenny Sweeney, National Archives at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

10:00 am to 10:30 am

Elections are Over! Now What?

10:00 am to 10:30 am
209B

It's time for the election season after party! Keep the excitement going with interactive lesson plans, games, and action civics projects that focus on elected officials' jobs. Free resources provided!

Emma Humphries, iCivics, Jacksonville, FL; Carrie Ray-Hill, iCivics, Madison, WI; Amber Coleman-Mortley, iCivics, Washington, DC
Middle Level Civics/Government

10:00 am to 10:30 am

10 Show Me What You Know! Styles of Assessment

10:00 am to 10:30 am
209A

Hold on! This fast-paced presentation showcases student projects from around the world. You'll leave inspired and ready to let students show me what you know!

Claire Varner, HSTRY, Boston, MA
Secondary/High School Global Connections

10:35 am to 11:17 am

10:35 am to 11:17 am

Election Season Engagement: Real World Activities in the Government Classroom

10:35 am to 11:17 am
209B

Senior high school students will get excited about voting with this election simulation. Students reflect upon political views, organize and execute campaigns, and track candidates. Resources will be distributed.

Jessica Kenney, Brooks DeBartolo Collegiate High School, Tampa, FL
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

10:35 am to 11:17 am

A Small World After All: The Declaration--A Global Approach

10:35 am to 11:17 am
209C

Explore the influence of global ideas on the U.S. Declaration of Independence, and how this document then made a global impact. Receive a complete lesson plan.

Holly Hoover, Stonewall Jackson High School, Mt. Jackson, VA; Michelle Cude, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA
Secondary/High School Global Connections

10:35 am to 11:17 am

Tracking Path to Success: Data-Empowered Students and Evidence-Based Instruction

10:35 am to 11:17 am
209A

Learn how to generate student-driven academic data to empower your learners! Participants will be exposed to US History PBL and multi-sensory approach developed in high school level at-risk classrooms.

Kristen Ahangari, Renaissance Charter High School for Innovation, New York, NY; Sven Dietrich, Renaissance Charter High School for Innovation, New York, NY
Secondary/High School US History

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

U.S. Founding Documents Matter! Social Studies Instruction Impacts SAT Success

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
147A

Students earn analysis in History/Social Studies scores on the new SAT. Delve into the social studies skills, sample questions, and instructional strategies that students need to be college- and career-ready.

Martha Morris, The College Board, Reston, VA
Secondary/High School US History

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

C3 in DC: Bringing the Framework to the Nation's Capital

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
201

How can the C3 Framework shape a district? Learn how the DC Public Schools social studies team and teachers integrated C3 into district curriculum, instruction, assessments, and professional development.

Scott Abbott, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC; Leslie Booth, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC; Donna Phillips, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC; Jayson Wilkinson, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC
Supervisory-Administrative Civics/Government

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

Using Inquiry to Find Economics in STEAM Children's Literature/Informational Texts

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
207B

Learn how to teach economic concepts through award-winning children's books, including science, technology, engineering, art, and math (STEAM) informational text selections like The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.

Mary Beth Henning, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
PreK-Elementary Economics

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

Taking Learning beyond the Classroom Walls: Implementing AP Human Geography with WE.org Service

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
204C

Learn successful strategies and how to overcome challenges associated with implementing service learning. See examples of students tackling complex global issues to improve both their own learning and their community.

Allison Hunt, duPont Manual High School, Louisville, KY; Merritt Robinson, duPont Manual High School, Louisville, KY
Secondary/High School Geography

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

It's Not All About Me? Fostering Global Citizenship

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
147B

Citizenship is the foundation of our democracy. The C3 Literacy Collaborative shares their implementation of the C3 Framework and ELA integration through model units on character development and global citizenship.

Rebecca Valbuena, Glendora Unified School District, Glendora, CA; Cathy Marston, Glendora Unified School District, Glendora, CA; Cathy Lindahl, Glendora Unified School District, Glendora, CA; Jane Thompson, Glendora Unified School District, Glendora, CA; Karen Batista, Glendora Unified School District, Glendora, CA
PreK-Elementary Civics/Government

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

Reciprocal Inquiry: How Teacher Insights Transformed Preservice Social Studies Methods

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
145B

Engage with a university professor and a teacher leader who transformed a methods class based upon voices of teachers in the field. Discover how team teaching revolutionized practice for both.

Margaret Ferrara, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV; Angela Orr, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV
Higher Education World History

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

Elementary Literacy Building Strategies with Carter G. Woodson Books

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
145A

The presenters will share literacy building strategies using Carter G. Woodson Award winning books.

Ana (Award Session Place Holder) Post, NCSS, Silver Spring, MD
PreK-Elementary Civics/Government

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

Missing Pieces of Evidence? History as Inquiry

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
103A

What happened to Aaron? What is the Exeter family doing? Explore what happens when there are missing pieces of evidence. Discover some mysteries of history!

Colleen Fitzpatrick, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; Stephanie Van Hover, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
Secondary/High School US History

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

They're Always Over Us: Presidential Authority and Drones

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
144A

When we use unmanned aerial vehicles in combat, is it an act of war? What rules govern their use? Explore America's use of drones, and the changing state of war.

Mark Pearcy, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ
Secondary/High School Civics/Government

11:15 am to 12:15 pm

Including Diverse Families in Early Social Studies Curriculum

11:15 am to 12:15 pm
141

This session will explore conceptions of family in elementary curricula sharing diverse families' hopes for inclusion in early social studies curriculum and best practices regarding the inclusion of diverse families.

Lara Willox, West Georgia University, Carollton, GA
PreK-Elementary Global Connections

11:15 am to 11:45 am

11:15 am to 11:45 am

Enhancing the History Classroom with History of Technology

11:15 am to 11:45 am
209A

IEEE, the world's largest engineering association, is developing inquiry-based multi-media resources for inquiry-based global history classes to enhance understanding of the complex role of technology in an increasingly globalized society.

Michael Geselowitz, IEEE, Hoboken, NJ; Kelly McKenna, IEEE, Hoboken, NJ; Adam Angelozzi, Freehold Regional High School District, Englishtown, NJ; Michelle Lilley, Freehold Regional High School District, Englishtown, NJ; Laurie Bisconti, Livingston Public Schools, Livingston, NJ
Secondary/High School World History

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