Social Education

Letter to the Senate Banking Committee about Wall Street Reform Legislation during the New Deal (Teaching with Documents)


--Christine Blackerby
The featured document on federal aid for school lunches and the accompanying essay on the School Lunch Act provide students with a unique chance to study the role of government.

Related:

The Dutch are Missing in the American Curriculum


--Anne Claunch
The Dutch contribution to America’s economic system and cultural fabric was highly significant, yet history textbooks barely mention their early seventeenth-century influence on America.

Related:

Creating Biography Webs to Investigate Individuals’ Historical Contexts (Elementary Education)


Gary Fertig and Rick Silverman
Creating biography webs helps young learners recognize how people, economic conditions, and significant events shaped the personal development of historic individuals.

Related:

Remnants from the Past: Using Scrapbooks to Make U.S. History Personal and Meaningful


John J. DeRose
Students learn how local history has coincided with national events and trends when they create scrapbooks to document the history of their high school.

Related:

The Chicago 8 Trial, 40 Years Later: A Case Study in Teaching [em]U.S. v. Dellinger[/em], 1969 (Looking at the Law )


Jeanne Polk Barr
A class reenactment of the Chicago 8 trial offers students a close look at the rights and restrictions of free speech and dissent in America.

Related:

Letter about the School Lunch Program (Teaching with Documents)


--Missy McNatt
The featured document on federal aid for school lunches and the accompanying essay on the School Lunch Act provide students with a unique chance to study the role of government.

Related:

In War, Is Law Silent? Security and Freedom After September 11


--Ed O’Brien
From airport security to wiretapping to racial profiling, in times of crisis, how do we balance the desire for personal freedom with the need for national security?

Related:

Debating War and Peace in Washington Square Park


--Robert Cohen, Diana Turk, and Emily Klein
This sampling of comments posted in Washington Square Park after September 11 shows that, along with sadness and anger, a democratic spirit is alive and well in New York City.

Related:

Hyperinflation and the Confederacy: An Interdisciplinary Lesson in Economics and History


--Brooke Graham Doyle
The Confederacy’s answer to revenue deficits during the Civil War was to print more money, leading to hyperinflation on an unprecedented scale.

Related:

Supreme Court Trends (Looking at the Law)


--Charles F. Williams
The year 2000 was a significant one for the Supreme Court. Many decisions affected education and children—from tobacco advertising to religion in the schools.

Related:
Syndicate content
Stay Connected with NCSS:   Follow NCSSNetwork on Twitter FaceBook.png rss_0.gif