Social Education

Alien Enemy Registration During World War I (Teaching with Documents)


--Helen Divjak and Lee Ann Potter
German immigrants who had not yet become citizens of the United States found their world turned upside down by a presidential proclamation declaring them enemy aliens in World War One.

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The War of the Words: Letters to the FCC Regarding Orson Welles’s 1938 Broadcast (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
Orson Welles’s famous 1938 broadcast of “The War of the Worlds” incited a mixed response—ranging from terror to delight—from listeners across the country.

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Documenting the American South: Thomas H. Jones and the Fugitive Slave Law


--Cheryl Mason Bolick
Online research archives are making it easier for students to do in-depth research with primary sources on a historic topic. Here are activities to help students learn how the Fugitive Slave Law affected one man’s life.

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The 1930 Census (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
What did it take to be a census enumerator for the 1930 census? What does a sample census schedule look like? The article examines the 1930 census and includes teaching activities that help students understand the importance of the census to the history of our nation.

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Eli Landers: Letters of a Confederate Soldier


--Stephanie Wasta and Carolyn Lott
Eli Landers, a young Confederate soldier in the Civil War, wrote poignant letters home to his mother, in which he described the battles he fought in, his fears and dreams, and the suffering he endured and witnessed.

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A Bill to Relieve Certain Legal Disabilities of Women (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
After a long struggle, Belva A. Lockwood became the first woman admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court.

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In the Wake of September 11: Civil Liberties and Terrorism (Looking at the Law)


--Bruce G. Peabody
The conflict between civil liberties and the “war on terrorism” involves three specific issues: the government’s right to eavesdrop on conversations between alleged terrorists and their attorneys, deportation and the “right to be silent,” and military tribunals.

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Bioterror


--Ruth Levy Guyer and Jonathan D. Moreno
Since September 11, the fear of a bioterrorist attack has become widespread. The authors look at the roots of bioterrorism, as well as the recent anthrax scare, and suggest ways that teachers can address bioterrorism with their students.

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Primarily, It’s Serendipity (Teaching with Documents)


--James A. Percoco
The correspondence between a baseball commissioner and President Franklin Roosevelt offers a creative approach to teaching World War II during baseball season.

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Connecting with the Past (Teaching with Documents)


--Lee Ann Potter
History becomes much more than past events and important dates, when students investigate the subtle clues buried in primary sources: Battle of Gettysburg map (1863); Yeager's letter about his flight of the XS-1 (1947); Manhattan Project letter (1945).

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