Social Education

Was the Constitution Pro-Slavery? The Changing View of Frederick Douglass


By Robert Cohen
Many have questioned whether the document on which our nation is based sanctioned slavery. But renowned abolitionist Frederick Douglass, who originally condemned the Constitution, came to view it in a much different light.

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Slavery and Free Markets: Relationships between Economic Institutions


--Mark C. Schug
This look at the contradictions between economic freedom and slavery provides a comprehensive view of the institution of slavery in world and American history.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7702/77021382.pdf

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Searching for the Seventies: Photographs from the Environmental Protection Agency’s DOCUMERICA Project (Teaching with Documents)


--Bruce Bustard and Lee Ann Potter
Examining key photos from a 1970s federal project can serve as a point of departure for an exploration of the national issues and environmental crises of that decade.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7702/77021352.pdf

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The Making of Campaign 2012: Collision 2012 and Double Down (Review)


--David Wolfford
Two recently published books offer behind-the-scenes insight into the 2012 presidential campaign and can help teachers illustrate important electoral concepts.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7801/780147.pdf

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They Should Have Sent a Poet: Deepening Students’ Understanding of History Through the Use of Poetry


--Christopher Lopez
The highlighted poems offer deep insights into three wars in which America was involved.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7801/780116.pdf

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From Freedom Riders to the Children’s March: Civil Rights Documentaries as Catalysts for Historical Empathy


--Lisa Brown Buchanan
These four documentary films can engage students in historical thinking, expand their capacity for empathy, and hone discussion and writing skills.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7802/78020491.pdf

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Is Baseball Essential?: World War I and the National Pastime (Teaching with Documents)


--Kris Maldre Jarosik and Jenny McMillen Sweeney
Documents related to baseball players and the military draft can launch a lesson on the American home front during World War I, as the 100th anniversary approaches.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7802/78020457.pdf

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The Rosenberg Trial—Uncovering the Layers of History (Looking at the Law)


--Bruce A. Ragsdale
Newly available online documents about the trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg offer students a unique opportunity to investigate, analyze, and craft their own narratives about this high profile Cold War espionage case.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7704/7704180.pdf

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“Under God” and the Pledge of Allegiance: Examining a 1954 Sermon and Its Meaning


--Eric C. Groce, Tina Heafner, and Elizabeth Bellows
A lesson exploring the Pledge of Allegiance, its history and the addition of the phrase “under God,” can serve as a jumping off point into major themes of U.S. history and First Amendment freedoms.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7704/7704185.pdf

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A. Philip Randolph’s Attempt at Equal Economic Opportunity: A Case Study (Teaching with Documents)


--Joel Walker
The two featured documents from the 1940s offer insight into the African American struggle for economic opportunity in the South and can help teach about the greater civil rights movement.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7704/7704174.pdf

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