Independence

Was the Constitution Pro-Slavery? The Changing View of Frederick Douglass


By Robert Cohen
Many have questioned whether the document on which our nation is based sanctioned slavery. But renowned abolitionist Frederick Douglass, who originally condemned the Constitution, came to view it in a much different light.

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Asking Students to Compare the Value of Information in Different Sources about the Same Event (Sources and Strategies)


--Scott M. Waring
A close look at the spy map that helped George Washington win the Battle of Princeton can place students in the role of historians as they analyze the map and other sources to shed light on this historic event.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7901/79011506.pdf

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Free Press in a Constitutional Democracy


--Christine Lucianek
Students will acquire a deeper understanding of freedom of the press when they consider the context for its inclusion in the First Amendment and examine its implications in the Internet age.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7806/7806298.pdf

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Magna Carta at 800: Ten Key Questions Answered (Lessons on the Law)


--Howard Kaplan
As the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta approaches, Lessons on the Law provides an overview of the “Great Charter” and identifies teaching materials to engage students.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7806/7806265.pdf

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Exploring the Legacy of Magna Carta with Students through Historic Images (Sources and Strategies)


--Stephen Wesson
The two featured portraits of Revolutionary-era writer John Dickinson next to a book titled “Magna Charta,” can launch an enlightening lesson on the thirteenth-century charter´s influence on America´s founding documents.
* http://socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7806/7806261.pdf

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Mapping Early American History: Beyond What Happened Where


--Andrew J. Milson
The three highlighted early American historical maps will provide students with important insight into the geographical understanding of people in the past and the implications of this limited knowledge.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7805/780514216...

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What Constitution Day Means and Why it Matters (Looking at the Law)


--Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Constitution Day offers an opportune time for students to explore the evolution of the founding document and examine its provisions for citizens’ rights and rules of government.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7804/7804160.pdf

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Encouraging Student Interest in the Economic Context of the Constitution with Continental Currency (Sources and Strategies)


--Lee Ann Potter
A close look at the featured currency issued by the Continental Congress can launch a lesson on the economic problems that preceded the drafting of the Constitution.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7804/7804157.pdf

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Piquing Student Curiosity with Title Pages from Works by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau (Sources and Strategies)


--Lee Ann Potter
The title pages of three books from the Enlightenment provide excellent points of entry for student research into the origins of ideas in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.
* http://www.socialstudies.org/system/files/publications/se/7704/7704168.pdf

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History Mystery Lessons: Powhatan Culture / Lewis & CLark


--Jana Kirchner and Carla Judd

The Pullout of the Jan/Feb 2011 issue of SSYL comprised two History Mystery Lessons: The first was about Powhatan culture, and included a clue sheet about life in a Native American village.

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