Civil War

Was the Constitution Pro-Slavery? The Changing View of Frederick Douglass


By Robert Cohen
Many have questioned whether the document on which our nation is based sanctioned slavery. But renowned abolitionist Frederick Douglass, who originally condemned the Constitution, came to view it in a much different light.

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Spielberg’s Lincoln Defines the President’s Emancipation Legacy


--David Wolfford
The film Lincoln spotlights Abraham Lincoln’s character and leadership and raises questions about the legislative process that enabled politicians to pass the Thirteenth Amendment that abolished slavery.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7701/77011344.pdf

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Changing Faces: Your State Hero in the U.S. Capitol


--Dennis Denenberg
Each state has a statue of one of its notable citizens displayed in the U.S. Capitol. Learn about this collection, read your state hero's biography, and/or propose a new hero!

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Lights, Camera, . . . Reenaction! Creating Video as We Study the Civil War


--Angela Stokes
A video project challenges students to read, research, and interpret historical sources, then create a short drama that reflects their understanding of events. Journey through Hallowed Ground sponsored this project, but you can do a low-budget version at your school.

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Encountering the Complicated Legacy of Andersonville


--James A. Percoco
Teaching about the Civil War through the study of historic sites, such as the Confederate prison at Andersonville, challenges students to wrestle with tough interpretations of American history.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7506/7506326.pdf

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From the Civil War to 9/11: Democracy and the Right to a Fair Trial


--Alan S. Marcus
The author examines The Conspirator—a film about the trial of Mary Surratt and the plot to murder President Lincoln—and outlines four key questions to guide teachers when using historical film in the classroom.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7504/7504196.pdf

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Learning History with Mini-Camcorders


--Jeremy D. Stoddard and Meg Hoffman
Three activities described here engage the creativity of at-risk students by incorporating mini-camcorders into the study of the American Revolution, Civil War, and Post-Reconstruction.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7502/7522011107.pdf

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Advocating for Abolition: Staging an Abolitionist Society Convention


--Andy Robinson and Joan Brodsky Schur
This simulation illustrates for students that the most complex debates in American history are not necessarily between those for and against social change, but among those who agree on the goal, but disagree on the means.
*http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7404/

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