The New Nation

History Mystery Lessons: Powhatan Culture / Lewis & CLark


--Jana Kirchner and Carla Judd

The Pullout of the Jan/Feb 2011 issue of SSYL comprised two History Mystery Lessons: The first was about Powhatan culture, and included a clue sheet about life in a Native American village.

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Changing Faces: Your State Hero in the U.S. Capitol


--Dennis Denenberg
Each state has a statue of one of its notable citizens displayed in the U.S. Capitol. Learn about this collection, read your state hero's biography, and/or propose a new hero!

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Evaluating Perspectives on Westward Expansion: Weighing the Evidence


--Stephanie Greenhut
A unique online tool helps students analyze documents from opposing perspectives, weigh each source’s significance, and come to evidence-based conclusions.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7506/7506317.pdf

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Constitution Day Lesson Plans


The NCSS Publications archives and a number of educational websites offer excellent lesson plans that can help teachers prepare for Constitution Day.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7504/7504226.pdf

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Learning History with Mini-Camcorders


--Jeremy D. Stoddard and Meg Hoffman
Three activities described here engage the creativity of at-risk students by incorporating mini-camcorders into the study of the American Revolution, Civil War, and Post-Reconstruction.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7502/7522011107.pdf

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Draft of the Constitution (August 1787) and Schedule of the Compensation of the Senate of the United States (March 1791) / TWD


--Michael Hussey and Stephanie Greenhut
The two featured documents can serve as a starting point for a lesson on public service while students debate the amount of pay that public servants should receive.
* http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7501/75011107.pdf

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Advocating for Abolition: Staging an Abolitionist Society Convention


--Andy Robinson and Joan Brodsky Schur
This simulation illustrates for students that the most complex debates in American history are not necessarily between those for and against social change, but among those who agree on the goal, but disagree on the means.
*http://publications.socialstudies.org/se/7404/

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The Constitution by Cell (Teaching with Documents)


--Stephanie Greenhut and Megan Jones
A pilot program at the National Archives challenges students to determine how certain documents illustrate the Constitution “in action,” then create digital stories using cellular phones and web tools.

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