Feed aggregator

On Religion: Mission Schools Opened World to Africans, but Left an Ambiguous Legacy

Education News from NY Times - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 2:35pm
The potentially subversive nature of Christianity’s teachings found expression in the education of a generation of rebels against apartheid.
    





Categories: Education News

Miss. 4th-graders learn state's history with blues curriculum

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
Fourth-graders at Tunica Elementary School in Tunica, Miss., are learning their state's history and other social studies, Eng -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

N.J. task force to focus on closing the economic achievement gap

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
School board members from 11 urban, rural and suburban districts in New Jersey are joining forces to identify strategies for  -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Okla. to allow for more tribal-language instruction

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
Lawmakers in Oklahoma altered a rule this year allowing the state's education department to offer an annual certification to  -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Fla. school's lab aids students' history project collaborations

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
The Collaborative Learning Lab at the Academy of the Holy Names in Tampa, Fla., is helping students work together on their hi -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Va. senator's bill exercise sparks 7th-graders' interest in government

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
Seventh-grade civics students at W.C. Taylor Middle School in Warrenton, Va., recently chatted with Virginia state Sen.  -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Pa. 4th-graders create art to help Alzheimer's patients

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
Fourth-graders at Waynesburg Central Elementary School in Pennsylvania who have been learning about Alzheimer's disease were  -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Present a Session at the 2014 NCSS Annual Conference

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
Join social studies educators from around the world in Boston next November to explore the civic mission of schools in the 21 -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain -- and most fools do.

NCSS Smartbrief - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:36pm
Benjamin Franklin, American statesman and Founding Father -More
Categories: Education News, Smartbrief

Strauss: Four tough questions about charter schools

Education News from Washington Post - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 1:00pm

Mark Naison, a professor of African American Studies and History at Fordham University and director of Fordham’s Urban Studies Program, has some important questions about charter schools. He is the author of three books and over 100 articles on African American History, urban history, and the history of sports, and he is a founder of the Badass Teachers Association. A version of this appeared on his blog, With a Brooklyn Accent.

Read full article >>
    





Categories: Education News

Think Homework Can Help Your Kid's Grade? Think Again

Education Week - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 10:49am
St. Louis-area schools beginning to rebuild how a child's performance in school is calculated—but many teachers and parents say they remain unconvinced of the new standards-based system's effectiveness.
Categories: Education News

Strauss: The invisibility of teachers

Education News from Washington Post - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 10:30am

It’s one of the great ironies of modern school reform that the very people who you would think should have some input into policy decisions -- teachers -- don’t. They are, for that purpose, invisible (though they someone wind up front and center when it comes time for reformers to find people to blame for troubled schools). P.L. Thomas, an associate professor of education at Furman University in South Carolina, writes in this post about the plight of teachers. Thomas edited the book “Becoming and Being a Teacher,” and wrote the book “Ignoring Poverty in the U.S.: The Corporate Takeover of Public Education.” This was published on his blog, the becoming radical.

Read full article >>
    





Categories: Education News

Calif. Schools Prepare for Transgender Rights Law

Education Week - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 9:19am
With a law that spells out the rights of transgender students in grades K-12 set to take effect in California, school districts are reviewing locker room layouts, scheduling sensitivity training for coaches, and other logistics like field trips and senior portrait dress codes.
Categories: Education News

Adjunct Faculty, History | Stevenson University

Latest Job Postings - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 6:42am
US - MD - Stevenson, Adjunct Faculty, HistoryStevenson UniversityThe responsibilities for this position will include some or all of the following: teaching, student advising, service and cooperative extension and admini
Categories: Jobs

Dean, College of Education | University of Oregon

Latest Job Postings - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 6:27am
US - OR - Eugene, Position: Dean, College of EducationReports to: Senior Vice President and ProvostReview: To ensure consideration, submit applications by February 28, 2014; Position will remain open until filled.The
Categories: Jobs

Strauss: How hard is teaching?

Education News from Washington Post - Fri, 12/27/2013 - 5:00am

How hard is teaching?

Here are some answers to the question:

“Giving a presentation to NASA about how the thermal protection system of a spacecraft is connected to its primary structure is a cakewalk compared to getting 30 teenagers excited about logarithms.” -- Ryan Fuller, a former aerospace engineer who now teaches high school in Colorado Springs, wrote in a piece on Slate.

--

“Teaching is hard. Not only because of the curriculum, not only because of the new tests, new rules, new measures. Not only because there are tests, tests, and more tests. But because it so often feels like an insurmountable, thankless, stressful endeavor. The rules are always changing. The tests are always changing. And the blame for anything and everything that goes wrong usually falls squarely on our shoulders.” -- Neyda Borges, teacher at Miami Lakes Educational Center in Florida, from this piece on the website of StateImpact Florida, a project of NPR.

--

“In the primary grades, we deal with gross bathroom-related issues. Even a high school teacher could never understand some of the crises related to bodily functions that a typical K-3 teacher has to deal with on a regular basis. Potty accidents (and more instances too disgusting to reiterate here) are something that we can’t shy away from. I’ve had third grade students who still wear diapers and let me tell you it’s stinky. Is there any amount of money or vacation time worth cleaning up vomit from the classroom floor with your own two hands?” -- Beth Lewis, from About.Com

--

“American teachers deal with a lot: low pay, growing class sizes and escalating teacher-bashing from politicians and pundits. Federal testing and accountability mandates under No Child Left Behind and, more recently, Race to the Top, have added layers of bureaucracy while eliminating much of the creativity and authentic learning that makes teaching enjoyable. Tack on the recession’s massive teacher layoffs and other school cuts, plus the challenges of trying to compensate for increasing child poverty, homelessness, and food insecurity, and you get a trifecta of disincentives to become, or remain, a teacher.” -- Stanford Professor Linda Darling-Hammond, in this piece on Huffington Post.

--

“Teaching is a hard job with long hours (with no overtime). It’s no way a 9-5 job (nor a 7-3 job). My job starts way before the students enter the classroom, and it starts again when the students leave the classroom. I work after school and I work at home at night. Most of the work has to do with preparing lessons, contacting parents, grading papers, going to numerous meetings, extra help for students, dealing with tons of administrative paperwork, etc. etc. etc. I feel like the time I spend in the classroom with students is like the end result you’ll have a good lesson and good rapport with the students because you did all your ‘homework’.

“Just know that you will not sleep much the first few years (at least). You will have to deal with difficult students, and even more difficult parents. You will have to deal with stupid administrative crap, You will be forced to follow curriculum and adopt teaching styles designed by people who probably have not taught in decades. You will not get much support from the administration. You will be pretty much on your own to figure things out. YOU WILL BE OVERWHELMED. And everyone around you will think that you have an easy job because your work is done at 3 pm (yeah, right) and you have the summers off (yeah, we don’t get PAID either).” -- Ms. K on Yahoo.

--

“We’re not just teachers. The word ‘teacher’ just doesn’t cover it. We’re also nurses, psychologists, recess monitors, social workers, parental counselors, secretaries, copy machine mechanics, and almost literally parents, in some instances, to our students. If you’re in a corporate setting, you can say, ‘That’s not in my job description.’ When you’re a teacher, you have to be ready for everything and anything to be thrown at you on a given day. And there’s no turning it down.” -- Beth Lewis, from About.Com

--

“You know, this is precisely why I loathed being a teacher! Young people are so infernally convinced that they are absolutely right about everything.” -- Professor Phineas Nigellus Black, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

--

“Teachers must take on a large agenda: to help students abandon the safety of rote learning; to instruct them in framing and testing hypotheses; and to build a climate of tolerance for others’ ideas, and curiosity about unusual answers, among other things. Teachers who take this path must work harder, concentrate more, and embrace larger pedagogical responsibilities than if they only assigned text chapters and seatwork. They also must have unusual knowledge and skills. They require,for instance, a deep understanding of the material and modes of discourse about it. They must be able to comprehend students’ thinking, their interpretations of problems, their mistakes, and their puzzles. And, when students cannot comprehend, teachers must have the capacity to probe thoughtfully and tactfully. These and other capacities would not be needed if teachers relied on texts and worksheets. In addition, teachers who seek to make instruction more adventurous must take unusual risks, even if none of their students resist. For if they offer academic subjects as fields of inquiry, they must support their actions and decisions as intellectuals, not merely as functionaries or voices for a text.” -- University of Michigan Professor David K. Cohen in this paper, “Teaching Practice: Plus a Change ”

Read full article >>
    





Categories: Education News

Getting Out of Discount Game, Small Colleges Lower the Price

Education News from NY Times - Thu, 12/26/2013 - 10:51pm
Many institutions that charge high tuition but also offer steep discounts are rethinking the allure of that model.
    





Categories: Education News
Syndicate content
Stay Connected with NCSS:   Follow NCSSNetwork on Twitter FaceBook.png rss_0.gif