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The Washington Post Local Education section provides coverage and analysis of schools, home school and education policy for DC, Maryland and Virginia. With in-depth coverage and analysis of Washington, DC education and schools, including DC charter schools, DC Schools Chancellor, DC teacher contract news and map of DC schools.
Updated: 5 hours 20 min ago

AFT backs annual testing, with an asterisk

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 1:59pm
As debate rages in Washington about whether a new K-12 federal education law should continue to require annual testing in math and reading, the nation’s second-largest teachers union has staked out a hybrid position.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Finding some Islamic truths in Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons: How a theology professor will teach about the attack

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 1:49pm
In Paris on Wednesday morning, thousands of people lined up to buy the latest copy of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the first issued since gunmen burst in and killed 12 people Jan. 7.For the cover, a surviving staff member, Renald Luzier, drew a cartoon of the prophet Muhammad holding a sign with what has become a symbol of support, “Je Suis Charlie.”Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Finding some Islamic truths in Charlie Hebdo’s cartoons: How a theology professor will teach about the attack

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 1:49pm
In Paris on Wednesday morning, thousands of people lined up to buy the latest copy of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the first issued since gunmen burst in and killed 12 people Jan. 7.For the cover, a surviving staff member, Renald Luzier, drew a cartoon of the prophet Muhammad holding a sign with what has become a symbol of support, “Je Suis Charlie.”Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: Rewriting No Child Left Behind: Competing views

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 12:46pm
(Correction: Alexander draft has two testing options, not one; he is not taking a stand yet as earlier version said)Sen. Lamar Alexander, the Republican from Tennessee who just became the chairman of the Senate education committee, says he is determined to get a bill rewriting No Child Left Behind to the Senate floor by the end of February. To that end, he just released his working draft legislation that calls for reducing federal involvement in local K-12 education, which you can read below.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

In Alaska and other energy states, low oil prices put pressure on public schools

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 10:55am
Plummeting oil prices are delighting millions of people across the country who can fill their gas tanks and heat their homes for a fraction of the usual cost. But in oil-dependent states, coffers are dwindling at an alarming rate, raising the specter of cuts to public services — including public schools.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Fed grant to help UC-Santa Barbara students, employees recover from mass shooting trauma

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 10:09am
Last spring, six students were killed and others badly injured in a mass shooting in the Isla Vista community near the University of California, Santa Barbara. Because many on campus continue to have ongoing psychological problems — some acute — the U.S. Department of Education will give nearly $570,000 to the campus to expand their mental health services.Read full article >>






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Montgomery overhauling approaches to school sex abuse allegations

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 8:52pm
Montgomery County took a first step Tuesday toward overhauling school practices for handling sexual abuse allegations, a move that followed public concern about recent incidents in two middle schools and scrutiny of such cases.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Why teachers should ask more questions

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 7:00pm
We often hear about or see for ourselves teachers who have major weaknesses. The thing that hinders so many, it seems, is that they rush through lessons too fast without stopping long enough to see whether everyone — or anyone — understands. They might ask a quick question of a student or two to determine whether the main points registered, but that’s it. They must stay on schedule. Our schools have standards that demand a lot of material be taught. Read full article >>






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Krupicka introduces bill to hike cigarette tax to fund education

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 6:46pm
A Virginia legislator has proposed hiking the state’s per-pack cigarette tax from 30 cents to $2 to fund education, a move he believes also will curtail illegal cigarette trafficking.Del. Rob Krupicka (D-Alexandria) authored the bill, which would raise the tax and earmark the additional revenue for K-12 education. He also started an online petition calling for the initiative.Read full article >>
Categories: Education News

For those trying to sort through the maze of college options, a Web site offers answers — and some college officials shudder

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 6:30pm
This story has been updated.These weren’t exactly the results Pam Horne, the dean of admissions at Purdue University, was expecting: A company billing itself as “the leading provider of research and analysis in higher education” had ranked the best engineering schools in Indiana, and Purdue didn’t even make the top 10 in the state.Read full article >>
Categories: Education News

John Deasy, former L.A. and Pr. George’s superintendent, lands new consulting job

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 6:30pm
Three months after resigning his post as superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, John E. Deasy has landed a new gig. He will consult for the superintendent training center funded by philanthropist Eli Broad, the California billionaire who was close to Deasy during his tenure at the head of the nation’s second-largest school system.Read full article >>
Categories: Education News

With Garrett’s ascension to Cornell presidency, women will lead half of the Ivy League

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 5:54pm
One by one, the glass ceilings of academia are vanishing. Elizabeth Garrett, president-elect of Cornell University, will become the first woman to lead that school when she takes office in July. But in the Ivy League, such firsts have become almost commonplace.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

The president proposed making community college free. This university president wants to make ALL college free.

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 5:45pm
After President Obama proposed eliminating tuitionfor many community college students, we turned to a longtime advocate of making higher education affordable, Shai Reshef, founder and president of University of the People, a nonprofit online university. His TED talk last summer has been viewed by more than a million people.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Senators set stage for debate about federal education law

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 5:44pm
Top Republican and Democratic negotiators over federal education law each took to the Senate floor Tuesday to lay out their sometimes conflicting visions for rewriting No Child Left Behind.Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), the chair of the Senate education panel, emphasized that he wants to shrink the federal footprint in local education, saying the Obama administration has acted as a “national school board” and that Congress ought to cede power back to states to decide how best to educate K-12 students. Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Extending community college would help 20-somethings emerging into adulthood

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 5:00pm
President Obama’s $60 billion plan for free community college for millions of students probably has little chance of going anywhere in a Republican-controlled Congress. Even so, the proposal raises an important question: Is 13 years of universal schooling enough when young people are taking longer than previous generations to grow up and engage in a fast-changing economy?Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: What are all these civil rights groups thinking?

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 4:02pm
What are all these civil rights and advocacy groups thinking?Nineteen organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union and the United Negro College Fund, just issued a joint statement (see text and full list of signatories below) about what they would like to see in a newly written No Child Left Behind law, which is the top priority of Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), the new chairman of the Senate education committee. And in their statement, they make some faulty assumptions about teaching and learning that have been the basis of flawed education reforms in the past.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Introducing Grade Point, The Washington Post’s higher education blog

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 12:20pm
Welcome to Grade Point, The Washington Post’s new higher education blog. Here, you’ll find a comprehensive daily report about colleges and universities nationwide, including breaking news, profiles of interesting people in higher education, stories about life on campus, and coverage of higher education policy and trends. We also will aim to include voices of those connected to higher education coast-to-coast, from university presidents to college freshmen.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: Report: Requiring kindergartners to read — as Common Core does — may harm some

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 10:19am
The Common Core State Standards call for kindergartners to learn how to read, but a new report by early childhood experts says that forcing some kids to read before they are ready could be harmful.Two organizations that advocate for early childhood education — Defending the Early Years and Alliance for Childhood — issued the report titled “Reading in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose.”  It says there is no evidence to support a widespread belief in the United States that children must read in prekindergarten or kindergarten to become strong readers and achieve academic success.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: U.S. education policy: Federal overreach or reaching for the wrong things?

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 7:00am
Education Secretary Arne Duncan is seen as the most powerful education secretary ever, given his use of federal funding and No Child Left Behind waivers to get states to follow school reform policies that he supported.  Many of his critics argue that his federal overreach is excessive and has encroached on local and state authority to run public school districts as they see fit. The author of the following posts asks whether there has been too much federal overreach, or whether the administration has used its executive power in education in the wrong ways. This was written by Arthur H. Camins, director of the Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. The ideas expressed in this article are his alone and do not represent Stevens Institute. His other writing can be found at www.arthurcamins.com.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: A Supreme Court case that public education advocates should be watching

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 5:00am
Critics of education reform that focuses on standardized tests for accountability purposes and the expansion of “choice” correctly point out that what happens in a classroom is impossible to entirely divorce from what happens to children outside their school buildings. Government housing, tax and other policies affect public schools, though they are very rarely considered when people talk about how to close the achievement gap or about how to provide more college access to children from low-income families. In the following piece, scholar Richard Rothstein looks at a coming U.S. Supreme Court case that he says could indirectly be the most important public school desegregation case since Brown vs. Board of Education was handed down in 1954 and ruled unconstitutional all state laws that created separate public schools for black and white children. In fact, in a piece last year on the 60th anniversary of Brown vs. Board, Rothstein noted that public schools remain segregated today because neighborhoods in which they are located are segregated, and he wrote, “Education policy is housing policy.”Read full article >>






Categories: Education News
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