Education News from Washington Post

Syndicate content Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post
The Washington Post Local Education section provides coverage and analysis of schools, home school and education policy for DC, Maryland and Virginia. With in-depth coverage and analysis of Washington, DC education and schools, including DC charter schools, DC Schools Chancellor, DC teacher contract news and map of DC schools.
Updated: 2 hours 22 min ago

Not a lot of comity on the House education panel, members split on how to rewrite law

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 6:38pm
While Democrats and Republicans in the Senate hold daily negotiations over a new federal education law, things are far more strained between the parties on the House side. As the House focuses on an updated version of the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act, Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.), the ranking member on the House committee on Education and the Workforce, sent a written request to Chairman John Kline (R-Minn.) to hold hearings.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

How a $2,000 Doritos Super Bowl ad became a million-dollar sensation

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 4:05pm
A frequent flier, Scott Zabielski faces a common dilemma. He’s 6 feet 3 inches tall, which means that squeezing his lanky frame into economy airline seats, crammed against other passengers, can be a challenge.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: How schools ruined recess — and four things needed to fix it

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 2:30pm
A post I published last summer by pediatric occupational therapist Angela Hanscom, titled “Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today,” continues to be popular today, as are two other related posts of hers, “The right — and surprisingly wrong — ways to get kids to sit still in class” and “A therapist goes to middle school and tries to sit still. She can’t. Neither can the kids.” Here is the fourth in her occasional series on movement in classrooms. Hanscom is the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Georgia State student art project shut down an Atlanta highway and evacuated a nearby downtown. Whoops!

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 2:13pm
If the goal of art is to disrupt, to shake people out of their routines, force onlookers to stop and think, then these Georgia State students really (albeit inadvertently) nailed it. Their class assignment shut down an Atlanta highway for almost three hours on Monday, when police responded to a report of a suspicious package affixed to a major bridge, sealed off the area and blew it up.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Howard U. Middle School responds to allegations on teacher departures

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 1:35pm
Nearly a week after allegations surfaced at a charter middle school on the campus of Howard University that three teachers were terminated because they wanted to teach more black history, the school’s board of directors issued a statement denying the claims.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Are charter schools public or private?

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 1:29pm
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), who is leading the Senate’s effort to overhaul the nation’s main federal education law, committed something of an education-reform faux pas Wednesday morning when he pushed back against the suggestion that all charter schools are public schools.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: Inside a segregated Nashville school at the collision of race and sports in the ’60s

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 6:00am
Before he made history as the first African American basketball player in the Southeastern Conference (at Vanderbilt in the late 1960s), Perry Wallace was valedictorian of the Class of 1966 at Pearl High School. A source of tremendous pride in segregated Nashville, Tenn., Pearl was known for excellence in the classroom and on the basketball court. This excerpt from “Strong Inside,” a new biography on Wallace (who is now a professor of law at American University in Washington D.C.), offers a look inside the mid-1960s halls of the brick, art-deco-style building in North Nashville. This is excerpted from “Strong Inside: Perry Wallace and the Collision of Race and Sports in the South,” by Andrew Maraniss, published by Vanderbilt University Press, 2014.  Maraniss, who can be reached through his website, tweets @trublu24. He will be speaking about his book on Wednesday, Feb. 4, in Atlanta at an event marking Black History Month. You can read a review of the book here.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: The ticket to longevity

Wed, 02/04/2015 - 5:00am
Most of the posts on this blog deal with preK-12 and higher education, but there is another entire area of the education world that is just as important — adult ed. In the following piece, Iris Krasnow, an assistant professor in the School of Professional and Extended Studies at American University in Washington D.C., writes about her own transition from teaching undergraduates to teaching courses for older women and why lifelong learning is vital — even for people in their ’90s.  Krasnow is the author of six books, which can be found on her website.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

University for Life? Council member proposes renaming UDC after Marion Barry

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 9:24pm
There’s already a Barry University. (It’s in Miami.) But the world doesn’t have a Marion Barry University.Yet.If D.C. Council member Vincent Orange has his way, the Post’s Aaron Davis reports, the University of the District of Columbia would be renamed in honor of the “Mayor for Life,” who was warmly remembered and honored at funeral services last month. He was known for his civil-rights record, his loyalty to his constituents, his help getting District residents jobs; he was also vividly remembered for his conviction for cocaine possession while serving as the city’s mayor.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Montgomery County school superintendent to step down

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 8:24pm
Montgomery County Schools Superintendent Joshua P. Starr will step down in two weeks, abruptly ending his tenure after failing to convince a majority of the school board that he was leading Maryland’s largest school system in the right direction.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: Why was Montgomery County’s superintendent ousted? Don’t ask the school board. It won’t say.

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 5:53pm
After days of speculation about why the Montgomery County Board of Education decided not to retain Schools Superintendent Joshua P. Starr for a second four-year term and allow (push?) him to leave in two weeks, long before the end of the school year, a noon news conference was called to clear the air. All eight members of the board turned out, along with Starr and a few board spokesmen.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Kentucky students to state lawmakers: Our voices should matter

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 5:46pm
When the superintendent of public schools in Fayette County, Ky., resigned late last year, students wanted to have a real say in hiring his replacement. But state law prohibited them from sitting on the selection committee.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

D.C. special-ed student information inadvertently posted online since 2010

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 5:33pm
Personal information for special-education students in the District has been publicly available online since 2010 through a security breach that D.C. public school officials reported on Tuesday. The personal data was included in training documents for special-education providers in 2010 and 2011. The documents, including one that was more than 300 pages long, were inadvertently posted to an internal Web site that was not secure, officials said. Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Joshua Starr’s three-year tenure as superintendent on par with big-city national average

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 4:44pm
Joshua Starr’s resignation after three and a half years as superintendent of Montgomery County Public Schools means his tenure will have been shorter than the national average, which is close to six years, according to AASA, a national association of school superintendents.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Arlington schools recognized for green energy usage

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 3:28pm
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recognized Arlington’s school system for its use of green energy, noting that about 10 percent of the electricity it used was generated by wind or the sun.Among the schools that participate in the Green Power Partnership, a voluntary program with the EPA, Arlington, Va., ranked second nationally for green energy usage from mid-2013 to mid-2014. The agency defines green power as power generated by wind, solar, geothermal or other sources that have low impact on the environment. The district used 4.7 million kilowatts of green power during that period, some of it purchased from Dominion Virginia Power and some of it generated by solar panels installed at several schools.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Senators introduce bill inspired by U-Va. student efforts to prevent rape

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 12:35pm
Public-high-school health-education classes would be required to include lessons about preventing sexual assaults and relationship violence under a bill introduced by Sens. Timothy M. Kaine (D-Va.) and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) Tuesday morning.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: Ten things you need to know about international assessments

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 12:00pm
Every now and then results from one international assessment or another come out and the United States inevitably winds up somewhere in the middle.  There is a great hue and cry about what this means for the future of American democracy (nothing good) and public education is blamed (along with good-for-little teachers). The only solution is to speed up the current smorgasbord of school reforms, the irony being that neither they, nor their predecessor reforms, did anything to improve the U.S. ranking on these international tests. So what are we to make of all of this? James Harvey, executive director of the National Superintendents Roundtable, tells us in this post. Harvey’s Seattle University dissertation was the basis of “School Performance in Context: The Iceberg Effect,” which is available free on the web pages of both the Horace Mann League, an organization that works to strengthen public schools, and the National Superintendents Roundtable.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Economist: Send Obama’s free-community-college idea back to the drawing board

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 11:04am
President Obama’s proposal to make community college free sparked a debate over the plan’s ambition, expense and details. We’ll feature some of those arguments here on Grade Point. Sandy Baum is a professor at George Washington University’s Graduate School of Education and Human Development and a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, a think tank focused on social and economic policy.  An expert in student financial aid and college costs, she raises some compelling questions about the idea of free tuition for community college. Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: Progressive labels for regressive practices: How key terms in education have been co-opted

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 6:00am
Words matter. As Arthur H. Camins noted here, the words accountability, no-excuses and choice have “been claimed and defined by currently powerful policy makers and associated with their values.” Thus accountability language evokes the authority of the powerful to direct others to improve education, but not shared responsibility. And “no excuses language evokes blaming teachers, administrators, students and their parents for disappointing outcomes, while deflecting attention from the need to address systemic issues, such as the burden of poverty on children’s lives and inequitable school funding.” In the following posts, Alfie Kohn expands on this theme. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books, the most recent titled “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom About Children and Parenting.” This post, which I am publishing with permission, appeared on Kohn’s website.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News

Strauss: When getting deferred from college is a gift

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 5:00am
This is the sixth post in a continuing series about a high school senior attempting to navigate through the college admissions process. She is Samantha Fogel, a student at The Derryfield School, a private college preparatory day school for grades six through twelve in Manchester, New Hampshire. Samantha and her college counselor, Brennan Barnard, are documenting her application process in a series of occasional posts that include the voices of her parents, teachers, friends and others. Her story may help debunk some myths surrounding selective college admission while providing a window into a time of transition for one young woman growing up in rural New Hampshire.Read full article >>






Categories: Education News
Stay Connected with NCSS:   Follow NCSSNetwork on Twitter FaceBook.png rss_0.gif