Education News from Washington Post

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The Washington Post Local Education section provides coverage and analysis of schools, home school and education policy for DC, Maryland and Virginia. With in-depth coverage and analysis of Washington, DC education and schools, including DC charter schools, DC Schools Chancellor, DC teacher contract news and map of DC schools.
Updated: 6 hours 16 min ago

Prince William’s newest high school to be named for Virginia’s oldest senator

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 6:29pm
Sen. Charles J. Colgan, who has represented a swath of Prince William County since 1976, is set to leave office at year’s end. But the county school board hopes his name and legacy will live on with the opening of a brand new high school named in his honor, set to open four decades after he took office.Read full article >>







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Fairfax School Board approves final $2.6 billion budget, with teacher raises

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 6:26pm
The Fairfax County School Board passed a final $2.6 billion budget Thursday night that includes pay raises for teachers, funding for full-day Mondays for elementary schools and later high school start times.Read full article >>







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Temple professor charged with selling trade secrets to China

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 3:49pm
The head of Temple University’s physics department has been charged with giving sensitive information about U.S. technology to China.Xioaxing Xi, a U.S. citizen who is a native of China, was charged with four counts of wire fraud, according to federal prosecutors. He allegedly sought “lucrative and prestigious appointments” in China in exchange for the information.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Poetry contest helps locked-up youth find their voices

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 2:31pm
Javon hardly said a word during the time he spent in Liz Reif’s English class at the juvenile detention center in Camden County, N.J. But the day he left the center, he turned in a poem. “I read it and my heart started beating a little more quickly. It was the best kind of surprise to receive as a teacher,” Reif said. “This kid never talks but he’s done this amazing piece of writing.”Read full article >>







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Two board members make the case: Sweet Briar had to close

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 2:21pm
After its president unexpectedly announced that Sweet Briar College would close forever in the summer, many alumnae and others challenged that decision. [The leaders failed the school, a former board member argues.]Read full article >>







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The leaders failed: A former Sweet Briar board member speaks out

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 11:45am
Maggie Saylor Patrick is a 2007 graduate of Sweet Briar College who serves as the Director of the Alumni Annual Fund at Carleton College. She was previously the Director of Development for Women’s Initiatives at Miami University, where she also earned a master’s degree in political science. A former board member at Sweet Briar, she says the school suffered from a failure of leadership so profound that it led to the decision to close the 114-year-old private women’s college in Virginia. Here’s her opinion:Read full article >>







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Strauss: The list of colleges that paid big money to the Clintons for speeches

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 6:47am
(Correction: An earlier version said that Bill Clinton was paid for two speeches at Hamilton College. One of them was actually given by Hillary Clinton.)The Clinton Foundation has disclosed that it received up to $26 million in payments that had not been previously disclosed, with about 20 colleges and universities on the list of organizations and institutions that paid fees for speeches by one of the Clintons —Bill, the former president; Hillary, the former U.S. senator and secretary of state; or Chelsea, their daughter.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Strauss: Teacher to lawmakers: How our testing fixation sucks the life out of the school day

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 5:00am
Many teachers today talk about how classroom life has changed in the era of high-stakes standardized tests, with “teaching to the test” — or, at least, teaching concentrated on making sure kids pass the test — creating a more rigid and less creative dynamic than before. But how does that actually look in a classroom? Here’s a post by a veteran teacher providing details. It was written by Matt Jablonski, who has been teaching U.S. history at Elyria High School in Ohio for the past 16 years. Here are comments he submitted to the Ohio Senate Advisory Committee on Testing, which has this as its charge, according to the panel’s webpage:Senate members have heard concerns from parents, educators and other stakeholders about state student assessments and their administration. Legitimate concerns have been raised both about the current state assessments as well as Ohio’s overall testing policies. With this in mind, the Senate President created the Senate Advisory Committee on Testing. The immediate charge of the committee will be to review and evaluate the PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College & Careers) math and English language arts state assessments and the AIR (American Institute for Research) science and social studies state assessments and provide advice to the Senate as to whether Ohio should consider alternative tests and/or make specific modifications to the tests for the next school year. The committee will also explore whether or not the quantity of testing currently being conducted in Ohio classrooms is out of balance with time students are engaged in active learning.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Strauss: The unexpected plot twists in one senior’s college admissions journey

Fri, 05/22/2015 - 4:00am
This is the seventh and final post in a series about a high school senior attempting to navigate through the college admissions process. She is Samantha Fogel, a student at The Derryfield School, a private college preparatory day school for grades six through twelve in Manchester, New Hampshire. Samantha and her college counselor, Brennan Barnard, have documented her application process in a posts that started last fall and included the voices of her parents, teachers, friends and others. I published her story to help debunk some myths surrounding selective college admission while providing a window into a time of transition for one young woman growing up in rural New Hampshire.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

The governor gave the commencement speech. To very few people.

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 5:04pm
Commencement ceremonies are mostly pretty similar, one to another. Graduates, caps and gowns, polite attention to a speaker at a podium.But at the University of North Texas, the keynote speaker — the governor of the state — addressed just a tiny fraction of the graduating class. And part of that small audience was actively protesting him — turning away from him, holding anti-Gov. Greg Abbott signs.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Board shortens Common Core-aligned tests known as PARCC

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 4:39pm
The Common Core-aligned tests that made their debut in 11 states and the District this spring will be approximately 90 minutes shorter next year, a change that comes after parents, teachers and school administrators expressed frustration with the amount of time devoted to the new exams.Read full article >>







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Free tuition would be nice, but is it what community college students really need?

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 3:54pm
President Obama’s proposal to make community college tuition free got a warm hug from Gene D. Block, chancellor of the 42,000-student University of California, Los Angeles. He called it “the most encouraging idea for higher education to emerge from Washington in years.”Read full article >>







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Was that a meteor shower Thursday morning in Northern Virginia?

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 2:56pm
Bob Ryan was driving to get a cup of coffee in Sterling, Va., on Thursday morning when he saw rocks the size of baseballs shower out of the sky.“They hit, and then smaller ones hit in succession like, ‘boom, boom, boom,'” Ryan said.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Strauss: Why we should diversify the overwhelmingly white U.S. teaching force — and how

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 6:00am
Students have been shown to benefit from having a diversity of teachers, yet the vast majority of teachers in the United States are white and female. What can be done about this? Leslie T. Fenwick, dean of the Howard University School of Education and a former visiting scholar at Harvard University, takes up that question in this post. Her research examines education equity, school leadership and urban school reform. She is a contributing author to the best-selling book “The Last Word: The Best Controversy and Commentary in American Education.” This appeared in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, and I am republishing it with permission.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Strauss: Did U.S. News use the wrong data in its 2015 ‘best high schools’ rankings?

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 4:00am
This is a post by three educators in New York who say they have found mistakes in the 2015 high school rankings published by U.S. News & World Report.  The three — Principal Carol Burris, Principal Sean Feeney and Assistant Principal John Murphy — detail where they believe the company that compiled the data for U.S. News went wrong, writing that “the data technicians used the wrong state data to evaluate New York schools for proficiency because they did not understand or ignored how high-school proficiency in English Language Arts and math is determined in New York State.” U.S. News said in an e-mail that it did not make any errors and that the educators are upset because the methodology for the high school rankings changed.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

U.S. public schools report fewer violent incidents

Thu, 05/21/2015 - 12:01am
The rate of violent incidents in the nation’s public schools fell between the 2009-2010 and 2013-2014 school years, a period in which security measures such as surveillance cameras became more widespread, according to new federal data released Thursday.Read full article >>







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Search stalled, Montgomery appoints interim schools superintendent

Wed, 05/20/2015 - 9:58pm
Montgomery County’s school board voted unanimously Wednesday to appoint one of the district’s senior leaders as interim superintendent for next school year, temporarily filling the post after suspending a national search for a new schools chief this week.Read full article >>







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Some high-performing principals to get three-year appointments

Wed, 05/20/2015 - 7:58pm
Some high-performing D.C. public school principals will be offered three-year appointments starting next school year, an effort to retain talented principals and respond to calls for more stability among city school leadership.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Va. testing interrupted three times because of issues with Pearson system

Wed, 05/20/2015 - 6:28pm
Virginia students taking the annual Standards of Learning exams were unable to log in to the tests for more than an hour Wednesday afternoon, the third time in a week that computer problems have disrupted the statewide standardized testing.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News

Search stalled, Montgomery appoints interim schools superintendent

Wed, 05/20/2015 - 4:37pm
Montgomery County’s school board unanimously voted Wednesday afternoon to appoint one of the district’s senior leaders as interim superintendent for next school year, temporarily filling the position after board members suspended a national search for a new schools chief this week.Read full article >>







Categories: Education News
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